Stroke Center

Photography Exhibit on Hudson River Opens at Hudson Valley Hospital Center

Works of Photographer Joseph Squillante on display May 13 - September 5

Photography Exhibit on Hudson River Opens at HVHC

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (March 28, 2011) –Stunning images capturing the beauty of the Hudson River will be on display at Hudson Valley Hospital Center starting May 13 when Hudson Valley Hospital Center exhibits of the works of Peekskill photographer Joseph Squillante as part of its "Art for Health" program.

 

 

The exhibitHudson River Suites: Photographs by Joseph Squillante, including a tribute to 9/11, opens with a receptionon Friday, May 13 from 4- 6 p.m. in the Hospital’s main lobby gallery at 1980 Crompond Road in Cortlandt Manor, NY. It runs through September 5. There will be an Art Tour at 3PM - please meet in the Main Lobby. RSVP required to the Curator, Suzanne Ashley, at JLIB_HTML_CLOAKING . One hour tour highlights the most interesting pieces in our private collection of close to 300 works of FINE ART by local artists located in 17 different gallery spaces throughout the facility.

From sailing ships to shorelines, mountains to marshes, lighthouses to bridges, and beyond,Hudson River Suites: Photographs by Joseph Squillanteincludes more than 30 images of the life along the Hudson River including its landscapes, architecture and its people. Among images is a 10th anniversary September 11 tribute—View from the World Trade Center, a stunning, large night scene of Manhattan and the Hudson taken in 1985, showing a view now lost forever.

Squillante is known for his classic black-and-white photographs that distill the timeless essence of the Hudson River, which has been his central subject for over 35 years. His romantic, quiet imagery depicts calm landscapes and waterscapes, intriguing elements of nature, striking architecture, and powerful portraits.In Hudson River Suites, Squillante expands his traditional black-and-white repertoire to include a series of color photographs that possess a painting-like quality.

Hudson River Suitestakes advantage of the freestanding partitions of the Hospital’s gallery space with each wall showcasing different aspects of the river through sets or “suites” of images. For example, one suite focuses on the Highlands and features a magnificent panorama of Peekskill Bay. The Adirondacks series shows the source of the Hudson at Lake Tear of the Clouds as well as a view over the Adirondack range from Mount Marcy, the highest point in New York. A powerful night shot of the illuminated George Washington Bridge and one of the Old Saugerties Lighthouse before its renovation are included in a segment on architecture. Squillante’s iconicBoy Fishing, as well as a portrait of a wildlife biologist cradling a bald eagle, are also part of a suite representing people of the river.

Squillante’s color images make up a group of their own, among which is a panoramic southward view from Verplanck, brilliant autumn foliage over the cliffs of the Palisades, a 100-year-old ice boat plying the ice on Tivoli South Bay, and a representation of Frank Gehry’s striking Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College.

Squillante, whose work is in the permanent collections of the New-York Historical Society, the Museum of the City of New York, the Albany Institute of History and Art, as well as Hudson Valley Hospital Center, among others, has spent the past three decades traveling the length of the Hudson capturing the beauty and romance of the river and surrounding landscapes as well as the people who live and work along its shores. ANew York Timesreviewer noted the “zest and sincerity” of the work; indeed the photographs inspire viewers of all ages.

"I reach out and share my work, I meet many people who also love the river," Squillante says. "My aim is to nurture and expand this community. I believe that a greater appreciation of this natural resource will lead to a better understanding of its importance. The Hudson is a universal subject and a continual source of inspiration."

Suzanne Ashley, curator of Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s 12 galleries of fine art work, said the Hospital hoped the community would take advantage of this inspiring display and visit the gallery.

"The Art for Health program not only subscribes to the belief that art can help in the healing process, but that in the true tradition of a community hospital, Hudson Valley Hospital Center is a place whose doors are always open to the community," said Ashley. We invite the public to view Mr. Squillante’s works as well as all of the inspiring artwork in our 12 galleries throughout the Hospital.

Squillante’s love of the river began in 1975, when his boyhood friend Tom moved from the Bronx to paradise—otherwise known as Tivoli, a village 100 miles north of Manhattan, population 362. Tom’s backyard was the Hudson River, flowing just beyond the railroad tracks with views of the Catskill Mountains. Since the Hudson River has In 2009 during the 400th anniversary of Henry Hudson’s voyage up the river, Squillante mounted several exhibitions from Manhattan to Albany, most noteworthy a solo showLife Along the Hudsonat the Albany Institute of History and Art. In 2004, his solo exhibitionThe Hudson River: A Visual Voyage opened the Beacon Institute, a research center spearheaded by former Gov. George Pataki.

Squillante and his wife, Carol Capobianco, founded the Hudson River School of Photography to cultivate an appreciation for the Hudson through workshops, presentations, in-classroom talks, lessons, exhibitions, and note cards and prints.
To view some of Squillante’s images, visitwww.hudsonriverphotography.comor go towww.youtube.com/watch?v=nnNfT5LBXJg

For more information, call 914-737-2314 or e-mail JLIB_HTML_CLOAKING .