Victoria Hochman

Victoria Hochman

Cortlandt Manor NY – (March 28, 2014) – Hudson Valley Hospital Center is among hospitals rated for safety in the most recent issue of Consumer Reports.

Quoted in the March 27 issue of The Journal News, Dr. William J. Higgins, vice president of medical affairs at Hudson Valley Hospital Center, said "we are extremely proud" to score high in the report, but noted the need for "continuous improvement."


The Consumer Reports survey covered 2,591 hospitals nationwide and 136 statewide and reviewed hospitals' overall safety based on patient-outcome data including mortality, re-admissions and hospital-acquired infections.


The article is available in the May issue of Consumer Reports and online at www.ConsumerReports.org, but accessing the ratings of individual hospitals at www.ConsumerReports.org/hospitalratings requires a paid subscription.


For more details on the study and to learn Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s ranking, click to see these reports by The Journal News and ABC News tonight.

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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org.
 

Wednesday, 19 March 2014 00:00

HVHC Celebrates Nursing Certification Day

Cortlandt Manor NY – (March 19, 2014) – Hudson Valley Hospital Center has more than 125 nurses with advanced degrees, evidence of a growing trend in which nurses pursue continuing education to improve the quality of healthcare for their patients.

Nurses at Hudson Valley Hospital Center were recognized for these accomplishments on March 19, which is celebrated as Nurse Certification Day in honor of the birthday of Greta Styles. Styles, who died in 2005, is recognized as a trailblazer in nursing for her advocacy of worldwide nursing standards and certification. As a result of her work, more nurses are seeking advanced degrees and statistics show that patients are benefitting.

“Here at Hudson Valley Hospital Center we are indeed fortunate to have so many dedicated nurses who voluntarily chose to pursue professional certification,” said Hudson Valley Hospital Center President John Federspiel. “These nurses have met rigorous requirements in specialized areas of practice as they progress along the continuum of lifelong learning. Most importantly, certification contributes to higher standards of patient care.”

Kathy Asadorian, assistant Clinical Nurse Manager in the Operating Room at HVHC, said that earning an advanced degree had improved her skills and allowed her to give better care to her patients. She said that continuing education was a lifelong pursuit for nurses.

Kathy Webster, Vice President of Patient Services at Hudson Valley Hospital Center, said that 34 percent of nurses at HVHC have achieved certification. She said that studies showed that patient mortality rates and length of hospital stays dropped in direct correlation to the number of nurses with advanced degrees.

“These nurses have made continuing professional development a priority and they assure our hospital and our patients that they have the knowledge and skills to deliver the highest level of care,’’ she said. “When we compare ourselves by specialty in the NDNQI national database, we have outperformed the benchmark for every specialty.”

 


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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org.
 

Friday, 14 March 2014 00:00

New Sports Medicine program at HVHC

Each year 1 in 100 female high school athletes will suffer a serious knee injury. The Center for Rehabilitation at Hudson Valley Hospital Center is doing something about it with a new Sports Medicine program that specializes in injury prevention, performance enhancement and rehabilitation of sports injuries.

"Athletes, especially young female athletes, are prone to injury of their ACL and it can be devastating to the athlete and the team,'' said Kyle Mack, PT, DPT, Clinical Manager, Department of Rehabilitation. "These injuries have become an epidemic and can sideline athletes for 6-12 months, but are preventable with the correct training.

The center is now also offering a SportsMetrics ™ ACL Injury Prevention program to schools and individual athletes. The center also offers Return to Sports Programs to help athletes recover from injuries more quickly and return to sports safely. Created under the direction of internationally-renowned orthopaedic sports medicine surgeon, Frank R. Noyes, M.D., Sportsmetrics™ is the first and only training program scientifically proven to decrease knee injuries in female athletes. It is a six-week jump training program that meets three times per week on alternating days and is comprised of a dynamic warm-up, jump/plyometric drills, strength training and flexibility exercises.

Knee ligament injury rates are 2-10 times higher in female athletes than in male athletes.  The majority of these injuries are non-contact, occurring in sports that involve pivoting, cutting or jumping. The ACL controls the pivoting and forward motion of the knee joint, along with the hamstrings muscles.  If these muscles are not adequately prepared, jumping/twisting motions may create shear forces, which can tear the ACL. 

Hudson Valley Hospital Center's Center for Sports Medicine is now offering this program. The centers’ team of highly-trained therapists work with the area’s top orthopedic specialists. They are part of The Hospital for Special Surgery’s Rehabilitation Network, and hold prestigious accreditations attesting to their expertise. Each team member offers specialized skills, significant experience and a dedication to improving patients’ lives.

The Center for Rehabilitation has consistently maintained a patient satisfaction rating or 90 percent and above.

 

To make an appointment for an evaluation, call 914-734-3455.

 

Wednesday, 12 March 2014 00:00

Expectant Parents' Guide

Your Baby, Your Way. It’s not just a slogan. It’s a philosophy.

Meet the Experts at our Maternity Fair May 10 at the JV Mall.  Win a $500 gift certificate in the Daddy Olympics.

At Hudson Valley Hospital Center we work hard to educate prospective parents on preparing for their special day. Did you know that the hospital you choose may be the MOST important decision you will make when it comes to the birth of your baby?

Here are some key questions you should ask before choosing a Hospital.

- Do you require an Intravenous line?

Many hospitals require moms to be tied to an IV line once they enter the maternity floor. This inhibits movement, making it more difficult for moms to labor comfortably. Moms at HVHC can walk the halls, use the whirlpool tubs and engage in physical activity to encourage labor and faster birth.

- Do you allow outside support during the birth?

At Hudson Valley Hospital Center we recognize that families may want their own birth support. We not only allow Doulas or labor helpers, but encourage them.

- Will you work with me to develop and honor my birth plan?
Download a sample birth plan from our website and we will work with you to help you achieve all the goals you set out.

- Do you allow family/siblings to be there for the birth?

Our Hospital is one of the few to offer sibling birth classes so older siblings can be part of this special day and help to bring their brother/sister into the world. Family members are welcome during delivery.

- Do you have whirlpool tubs and can I have a water birth?
HVHC has whirlpool tubs in every labor and delivery room. Our moms are encouraged to labor in the tubs to ease labor pains and some choose to deliver in the tub.

- What options do you have for controlling pain?
At HVHC we encourage moms to deliver naturally, but if they choose pain medication we will support them with a full range of options, which includes not only traditional medications, epidurals etc., but alternatives such as acupuncture and guided meditation.

- If I have to have a Cesarean Section , can my baby remain with me?
At most hospitals if you have a Cesarean Section you will be separated from your baby. Not at HVHC. At Hudson Valley Hospital Center, our C-section rate is low. But even if you have one, we believe that mothers and babies should begin bonding immediately. Our mothers begin breastfeeding right in the operating room in what is called skin to skin bonding. Studies show that this not only helps babies acclimate to breastfeeding more quickly, but releases hormones in mom that can help her recover more quickly.

- Do you allow VBACs at your Hospital?

A VBAC stands for vaginal birth after Cesarean . For many years, it was common to think once a C-Section, always a C-Section. Mothers who delivered that way once were prevented from trying for a vaginal birth the second time. Some hospitals still follow this outdated rule. At HVHC, not only do we support moms who aspire to VBAC, but we encourage moms – even those who have had two C-sections – to try to deliver vaginally. Of course, the safety of mom and baby always comes first.

-What does your hospital do to support breastfeeding?

Many hospitals say they support breastfeeding, but HVHC goes above and beyond. Babies at HVHC room in with their moms. That way moms and babies are experts at breastfeeding before they leave the hospital. Not only does HVHC have a lactation consultant to advise moms in the hospital, but a dedicated phone assistance line that new moms can call once they return home. And they can get more support from the consultant and other moms at our breastfeeding support group that meets twice a month. Much of this is available in other hospitals, but we are the ONLY hospital in the region that is designated as a “Baby Friendly” hospital for our superior maternity and breastfeeding support programs.

- Aren’t all hospitals “Baby Friendly?”

The answer is a resounding no! Baby Friendly is a special designation given by the World Health Organization and Baby Friendly USA for excellence in maternity care and breastfeeding support. Only a small, selective group of hospitals nationwide have received this designation, and we are the only ones in Westchester, Rockland, Putnam, Orange and Dutchess counties. In order to become Baby Friendly, hospitals must meet a strict set of guidelines and requirements including:
-Completing a period of comprehensive training and preparation
- Providing new mothers with optimal care, information and instruction to successfully breastfeed or feed formula to their babies
- Undergoing a rigorous yearly review

What's your policy with twins?
At HVHC we specialize in multiple births. Many hospitals encourage C-Sections with twins. Not at HVHC. We believe that moms should have the option of delivering twins vaginally. If a C-Section is required, moms can still bond with her babies in operating room. We also have a Level II Neo-natal Intensive Care unit if the need should arsie so parents of multiples can feel safe and secure.

 

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (March 6, 2014) – Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s program for hospitalized older adults has been recognized by the prestigious NYU College of Nursing program as one of the top NICHE hospitals in the nation.
Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) recently released a list of nine hospitals that have achieved Exemplar status for the progress of their nurse-driven programs in raising the level of quality in care of older adult patients. HVHC was the only hospital in the region to receive this honor.

Exemplar is the highest of four levels of recognition. Progressing through Early Implementation, Progressive, and Senior Friendly levels to achieve the Exemplar designation indicates a hospital has demonstrated ongoing, high-level dedication to geriatric care and preeminence in the implementation and quality of system-wide interventions and initiatives.

“These hospitals showed a tremendous commitment to meet one of the most critical challenges of our times - quality care of older adults,” said Linda Bub, MSN, RN, GCNS-BC, director, education and program development. "The hospitals’ dedication to drive continuous improvement processes and enhance care marks them as leaders in the field."


The Exemplar hospitals will be honored at the national NICHE conference in San Diego, April 6-8.

Suzanne Mateo, chair of HVHC’s NICHE team, said that Hudson Valley Hospital Center worked hard for the designation by educating the public and the entire nursing staff on geriatric care and by incorporating NICHE philosophy into all hospital departments.

The NICHE team at HVHC showcased their work in October with a “Silver Linings” Health Fair, in which they demonstrated the work they do with older adult in-patients- from education on hydration and nutrition to increased mobility.
“We made a commitment as part of our Magnet designation to elevate our practice,’’ said Mateo, MA, BSN, RN. “We worked hard to bring NICHE practice into all aspects of care here at HVHC and are very proud to be recognized for this accomplishment.’’
People over 65 are the fastest growing age group in the nation, making up 12.9 percent of the population or about 1 in 8 people in the United States. By 2030, estimates are that there will be about 72.1 million older adults, according to U.S. Census data.
Other hospitals to achieve Exemplar status are: Aurora Memorial Hospital of Burlington (Wis.); Aurora West Allis (Wis.) Medical Center; Bon Secours St. Francis Medical Center, Midlothian, Va.; Detroit (Mich.) Receiving Hospital; Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital, Commerce Township, Mich.; Newark-Wayne Community Hospital, Newark, N.Y.; Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, Mich.; and UC San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, Calif.

About NICHE
NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) is an international program designed to help hospitals improve the care of older adults. The vision of NICHE is for all patients 65-and-over to be given sensitive and exemplary care. The mission of NICHE is to provide principles and tools to stimulate a change in the culture of healthcare facilities to achieve patient-centered care for older adults. NICHE, based at NYU College of Nursing, consists of over 500 hospitals and healthcare facilities in the U.S., Canada and Bermuda.

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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

 

Frank B. Dorsa, MD of NYU Hudson Valley Cardiology Group at Hudson Valley Hospital Center, has passed his recertification exam in nuclear cardiology, according to The Certification Board of Nuclear Cardiology (CBNC).

Dr. Dora was also recently recertified in cardiology and echocardiography.  Nuclear Cardiology uses noninvasive techniques to assess myocardial blood flow, evaluate the pumping function of the heart as well as visualize the size and location of a heart attack. Among the techniques of nuclear cardiology, myocardial perfusion imaging is the most widely used. To date 9,942 physicians have been certified in nuclear cardiology.

Dr. Dorsa is a board certified cardiologist who has been practicing at Hudson Valley Hospital Center since 1992 as one of the original members of the NYU Hudson Valley Cardiology Group. Dr. Dorsa lives in Cortlandt Manor with his wife and children.

Cortlandt Manor NY – (March 3, 2014) – America’s children don’t get enough sleep and parents need to do more to control electronics and regulate bedtimes, according to a poll released this week by the National Sleep Foundation.

National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep in America® poll, an annual study that began in 1991, delved into the sleep practices and beliefs of the modern family with school-aged children. The online poll, conducted Dec. 12-13 2013, surveyed 1,103 American parents with children aged 6-17.


“For children, a good night’s sleep is essential to health, development and performance in school,” said Kristen L. Knutson, PhD, University of Chicago. “We found that when parents take action to protect their children’s sleep, their children sleep better.”


March 3-10 is National Sleep Awareness Week when health professionals focus on the important role that sleep plays in overall health. Chronic lack of sleep may be caused by sleep disorders that affect our immune systems’ ability to fight disease. Lack of sleep can also lead to serious health risks and other medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, stroke or weight gain.
The Center for Sleep Medicine at Hudson Valley Hospital Center performs sleep studies that can help diagnose more than 80 sleep disorders including the more common disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), narcolepsy, insomnia, periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) and restless leg syndrome (RLS).

The center is offering free sleep evaluations during March. Take a sleep quiz to find out if you may have a sleep disorder.


Many children are not getting the sleep they need


Many children get less sleep on school nights than they should, with some getting less sleep than their own parents think they need. The poll asked parents to estimate how much sleep their child typically gets on a school night. Parents’ estimates of sleep time are 8.9 hours for children ages 6 to 10, 8.2 hours for 11 and 12 year olds, 7.7 hours for 13 and 14 year olds and 7.1 hours for teens ages 15 through 17.


The NSF recommends that children ages 6 to 10 get 10 to 11 hours of sleep per night, and that children in the other three age groups get 8.5 to 9.5 hours per night.


Turning electronics off while sleeping makes a difference


Electronic devices are pervasive in modern American children’s bedrooms. Parents report that nearly three out of four (72 percent) children ages 6 to 17 have at least one electronic device in the bedroom while they are sleeping.
Children who leave electronic devices on at night get less sleep on school nights than other children do, according to parents’ estimates – a difference of up to nearly one hour on average per night.


“To ensure a better night’s sleep for their children, parents may want to limit their children using technology in their bedroom near or during bedtime,” said Orfeu Buxton, PhD, Harvard Medical School.


Evening activities and homework can affect sleep quality


The modern family’s busy schedule affects their sleep quality. More than one-third (34 percent) of parents report that scheduled evening activities pose challenges to their child getting a good night’s sleep and even more (41 percent) point to these activities as challenging their own good night’s sleep. One in four (28 percent) parents report that in the last seven days, homework made it more difficult for their child to get a good night’s sleep.


“Sometimes performing better in fewer activities can be a healthy trade for too many activities while fatigued,” said Hawley Montgomery-Downs, PhD, West Virginia University.


Enforcing rules helps children get more sleep


When parents set and enforce sleep rules, children sleep longer. Nearly all (92 percent) parents set one or more sleep-related rules for their children and 62 percent of parents say they always enforce at least one


To learn more about sleep and your health, speak to our Hudson Valley Hospital Center health professionals on Saturday, March 8 from 11 to 4 p.m. at the Premier Athletic Club Health and Wellness Fair, 2127 Albany Post Road, Montrose or at the Hudson Valley Gateway Experience on Saturday, March 22 at the Mansion at Colonial Terrace, 119 Oregon Road, Cortlandt Manor. For a free sleep evaluation, call 914-734-3840.


Editor’s Note: The full 2014 Sleep in America® annual poll report is available for download at http://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-polls-data/sleep-in-america-poll/2014-sleep-in-the-modern-family.

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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org.
 

Tuesday, 04 March 2014 11:44

Sports Medicine

 


The Center for Rehabilitation at Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s new Sports Medicine program specializes in injury prevention, performance enhancement and rehabilitation of sports injuries. Our team of highly-trained therapists work with the area’s top orthopedic specialists. They are part of The Hospital for Special Surgery’s Rehabilitation Network, and hold prestigious accreditations attesting to their expertise. Each team member offers specialized skills, significant experience and a dedication to improving patients’ lives. The center now also offers SportsMetrics ™ ACL Injury Prevention program. ACL injuries can sideline an athlete for 6 to 12 months. We also offer Return to Sports Programs to help athletes recover from injuries more quickly and return to sports safely. The Center for Rehabilitation has consistently maintained a patient satisfaction rating or 90 percent and above.

Foot or ankle injuries? Dr. Katherine Ma, a fellowship trained foot and ankle orthopedic surgeon, is part of HVHC's team of physicians who work with trained physical therapists to help you recover faster. Click here to learn more about Dr. Katherine Ma and see a video where she talks about foot and ankle conditions on Health Smart, a health education show produced by Hudson Valley Hospital Center.

Call 914-734-3455 for an appointment or for more information.

Meet our Team

Kyle Mack, PT, DPT
Clinical Manager, Department of Rehabilitation

Kyle Mack has worked at HVHC’s Center for Rehabilitation for 16 years and has served as clinical director since 2004. He has been an Adjunct Professor at New York Medical College since 2009. Kyle holds a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from Utica College and is a certified instructor of the SportsMetrics TM ACL injury prevention and athletic performance enhancement training. Other certifications include Certified Functional Manual Therapist (2005); Functional Orthopedic Certified (2005) and Bachelor of Arts degree in Physical Therapy (1992).


“I am enthusiastically committed to the advancement and practice of the profession of physical therapy. Throughout the course of my professional career, I have sought out what I have considered the best practice techniques and studied them. My latest passion is the prevention of ACL injuries in the young female athlete, which are currently at epidemic levels.”

John R. Astrab PT, DPT, OCS, MS, CSCS

John Astrab has over 15 years experience in both corporate fitness and outpatient physical therapy. John obtained a post-professional Clinical Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the University of Saint Augustine and a Master’s of Science degree in Physical Therapy from Mercy College, a Master’s of Science degree in Exercise Physiology from Long Island University and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Manhattan College. John is a board certified orthopedic clinical specialist in physical therapy (OCS) and a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist (CSCS). He is also a member of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT) and the National Strength & Conditioning Association (NSCA), as well as being a member and holding credentials from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and United States Weightlifting Federation (USWF).

"I my practice I use an eclectic, assessment based and evidence based treatment approach in the management of pain and movement dysfunctions. As a functional manual physical therapist, I employ soft tissue mobilization and joint mobilization techniques aimed at mechanical barriers, coupled with neuro-muscular re-education and motor control training to normalize normal movement patterns.”- John Astab


Chitra Taneja, PT, DPT, MS

Chitra Taneja has more than 10 years experience as a physical therapist and has worked as an athletic trainer for both high school and college sports teams. Chitra holds a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree as well as Master’s of Science degrees in Physical Therapy and Sports Psychology. She also holds Bachelor’s of Science degrees in Psychology and Education (Athletic Training). She has been a licensed Physical Therapist since 2002 and an Athletic Trainer since 1991. She is a member of APTA and NATA.
“I implemented the Athletic Training program and was head Athletic Trainer at South Suburban College in Illinois and also implemented the Athletic Training program and was head Athletic Trainer at Rye Country Day School. I served as the head Athletic Trainer for a semi-professional hockey team in Michigan. I have worked extensively with male and female athletes to help improve their performance and return to sports.’’

 

Renee Lemieux PT, DPT

Renee Lemieux graduated from Hunter College with a Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy. She completed a Master’s degree in Orthopedics with focus in manual therapy and then her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from Touro College in 2009. Her research was a pilot study exploring the efficacy of eccentric exercise in tennis elbow.
Main interests are movement re-education, postural training and manual therapy.
“I have worked at Hudson Valley Hospital Center for the past 12 years in the orthopedic department and have had the privilege to treat several orthopedic conditions. My past experience as a professional dancer with a NYC base company has given me the opportunity to explore movement mechanics, core stability and the importance of postural training.”

 

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (February 26, 2014) – Animal lovers will delight in the antics of lovable cats and dogs captured in artwork currently being featured as part of Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s new exhibit, “Cats and Dogs, Winter and Spring.”

The exhibit, which showcases the works of five local artists, is on display through April 28 as part of the Hospital’s “Art for Health” program curated by artist Suzanne Bohrer Ashley. The public can meet the artists at a reception in the Hospital lobby on April 19 from 4- 6 p.m.

The works on display range from oil and acrylic paintings to photographs. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a series of animal portraits by photographer and animal advocate Liza Wallis Margulies.

“Whether I’m photographing people, dogs, cats, frogs, sunsets, streams or cloudy mornings, I hope to develop a rapport that goes beyond our roles as photographer and subject. It’s in that rapport that I work to reveal that which lay just beneath the surface,’’ said Margulies of her work.

The exhibit can be viewed by the public from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily in the lobby gallery and along the main corridors of the Hospital. Visitors may also view the permanent “Art for Health” collection, which features 300 original works in 17 gallery spaces throughout the campus. Artists interested in exhibiting at the hospital should contact curator Suzanne Ashley at the hospital. Contributions of art are also welcome.

About the artists:
Joy Tobin lives and works in Brewster, New York. She has been an artist and art teacher for over 25 years and is named in Who's Who among American Teachers. Joy has taught watercolor workshops at the Hammond Museum in North Salem, NY and continuously on various international cruise ships. The artist has a BA and MA in art and has studied with watercolorists Mel Stabin, Judy Wagner, and Judi Betts. She has had numerous solo exhibits and has been featured in galleries in New York, Connecticut, and also in the Bahamas. Her paintings can be found in collections throughout the United States and also in Canada, Puerto Rico, and the Bahamas.
Basia Goldsmith lives on Riverside Drive in New York City where she enjoys a splendid view of the Hudson River. She was born in Poznan, Poland. As a child and her family were sent to an internment camp in North Africa before being relocated to Scotland where she grew up on a farm and attended a Catholic boarding school in London.

At the age of 16, Basia attended London's Central School of Art. After graduating, she moved to France and became a textile designer in Paris. In her early 20,s Basia moved to New York City where she continued her work as a freelance textile designer. She has since devoted her time exclusively to painting.

Ginny Howsam Friedman has exhibited throughout New York, New Jersey, Conn. and Massachusetts and is a member of the Piermont Fine Arts Gallery in Piermont NY. She talks about her work with enthusiasm.
"Mother Nature understands the effect of complementary colors. . . .I’m excited when I see light flash or a woods backlit or muted tones on a foggy day. And I love a view with the excitement of light bouncing all over," she says.
Liza Wallis Margulies says she loves photographing faces and would rather do that than just about anything else. “My main photographic interests are portraits, animals, night time,’’says Margulies. “My favorite subject is faces, all kinds, all shapes, all ages, all species. I can't recall a time when I didn't have an interest in photography.”
Robert Uricchio's passion for photography began at an early age as he focused on his hometown of Jackson Heights, NY. After a 20-year career with the New York City Police Department, he has once again gone back to what he enjoys most, photography. He is currently manager for an architectural website in addition to doing some film editing as well. He has photographed several famous museums and major works of art and edited videos about museums, their art, artists and architecture.

For more information on Art for Health or the artist reception, call 914-734-3557.
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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

Monday, 24 February 2014 11:18

Healthy Cooking Classes in March

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (Feb. 24, 2014) – Making some modest changes in your diet can improve your heart health. Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s new Peter X. Kelly Teaching Kitchen offers healthy cooking classes throughout the year and is offering some special classes in March.

Part of the Hospital’s Harvest for Health program, The Peter X. Kelly Teaching Kitchen offers cooking classes to people of all ages for a nominal fee of $15 per class. Here’s what’s on tap for March:

Wednesday, March 5th. 2-3:30 p.m.
Easy and Economical Meals.

Nothing beats the ability to quickly whip up a satisfying meal without breaking the bank. This class will include several great recipes that don’t call for a lot of time or expensive ingredients. Skip the dollar menu and fast food, and feed your family a healthy alternative that is easy to make. Impress without the stress! ($15).

Tuesday, March 11th. 2 – 3:30 p.m.
Cooking with Whole Grains.

Quinoa, bulgur, barley, millet. All of these are whole grain options that deliver awesome taste and texture, along with fiber and nutrients. Come learn awesome ways to cook up whole grains in dishes that will add new dimensions to your cooking. This class will be led by Chef Noah Sheetz. Noah is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America and spent many years as the Executive Chef to the Governors of New York State. Now, Chef Noah serves as the Executive Chef for Hudson Valley Hospital Center. ($15).

Friday, March 14th. 6-7:30 p.m.
St. Patrick’s Day Specials.

There’s more to St. Patrick’s Day than green beer and corned beef. Take a class that explores the uncelebrated but fun world of Irish cuisine. Whether it’s a hearty soup or a surprisingly enticing cabbage dish, this evening class will open your eyes to the joys of cooking for St. Patrick’s Day. ($15).

Sunday, March 16, 3-4:30 p.m.

Heart-Healthy Mediterranean Menus. The Mediterranean Diet is perhaps the most well-studied and accepted diet for promoting heart health. What’s more, it’s downright delicious. Featuring healthy fats, delectable vegetables, and lean proteins, this is a diet anyone can enjoy. In this class, you’ll learn the principles of the Mediterranean Diet and how to cook an easy meal that will lower your risk of heart disease. This class will be lots of fun, and who can argue with a diet plan that includes an optional glass of red wine? ($15).
Saturday, March 29, 3-4:30 p.m.

Cooking With Your Family. Bringing your family together in the kitchen is a great way to have fun and bond over great food. Get everyone involved in this class and make cooking together an economical way to spend time with your family. All family members age 6 and up are welcome in this class. ($15).

For more information on cooking classes, call 914-734-3780 or register on line at www.hvhc.org


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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org