Victoria Hochman

Victoria Hochman

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (Feb. 14, 2014) – Spend a fun Saturday with your family and learn how to improve your health while supporting a great cause.

Premier Athletic Club in Montrose will hold its Health and Wellness Expo on Saturday, March 8 from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.at the club. This day of fun-filled activities will to help raise money for the Hendrick Hudson School District’s Food Services Program. The public is invited to use the club’s facilities free of charge from 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.. Swim and participate in fitness classes from Body Pump to Zumba, Spinning to Yoga.

Kids can enjoy face painting, an air castle and swimming. They can learn about their health at a Teddy Bear Clinic and parent can have their children fingerprinted for identification purposes free of charge. The nursery will be open from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. to give parents a break to enjoy the activities.

Hudson Valley Hospital Center will sponsor free health screenings in the club’s newly-renovated gym. Blood pressure and cholesterol screenings will be offered as well as evaluations for sleep disorders. Physicians and physical therapists from the Hospital’s new Sport Center will be on hand to conduct sports performance screenings and discuss the center's new ACL injury prevention program. Hudson Valley Blood Services will conduct a blood drive from 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Enjoy a mini-massage for $10 with all proceeds going to the Hendrick Hudson Food Services program. The day will also include raffles, prizes and gift bag to the first 100 people.

Premier Athletic Club is located at 2127 Albany Post Road, Montrose, New York. For more information call, 914-739-7755

See schedule of activities below:
• Try any class for free:

- BodyPump, 9:15-10:15am
- Spinning, 9:15-10:15am
- Water Fitness, 9-10am
- Interval Madness, 10:15-11:15am
- Spinning, 10:30-11:15am
- Bodyrolling,11:15am-12:30pm
- Zumba, 1pm
- Yoga, 4-5pm

11am-4pm:
- Air Castle
- Face Painting
- Swimming
- and more much!

• 11am-1pm:
- Protect Your Children with
Ossining Police Fingerprinting

 

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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

 

Cortlandt Manor, NY – (February 11, 2014) – The Hope for Youth Foundation has donated $10,000 to Hudson Valley Hospital Center to support a new program that uses cooking to teach youngsters about healthy eating in the battle against childhood obesity.
The Young Chefs of the Hudson Valley offers weekly cooking classes to at-risk children ages 11-13 in area school districts. Parents can also sign their children up for small group classes. The program, run by trained chefs and dietitians on staff at HVHC, aims to improve the health of children and reduce the risks of obesity. It is one of several community classes for all ages being taught in the Hospital’s new Chef Peter X. Kelly Teaching Kitchen.
“We are grateful to Jim Witt and the Hope for Youth Foundation who have for many years generously supported programs at our Hospital that are aimed at improving the lives of young people,’’ said Hudson Valley Hospital President John C. Federspiel. “Teaching the value of healthy eating can never start early enough if we are to stem the tide of chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes and heart disease.”
The Hope for Youth Foundation/Peekskill Rotary Club (HFY) donates money to area children's charities. HFY assists children who are mentally and/or physically challenged, or who are ill or disadvantaged and supports youth programs which facilitate healthy growth whether it is academic, emotional or athletic. The Foundation’s principle source of revenue is the annual sale of weatherman Jim Witt’s Long Range Weather Calendar, which is known for its dramatic Hudson Valley photographs and its daily and long range weather forecasts.
The kitchen is part of the Hospital’s Harvest for Health program, a multi-faceted program featuring an organic garden, Farmers’ Market and Hospital food service that uses locally grown produce. The kitchen is named in honor of “Iron Chef” winner, Chef Peter X. Kelly, who has been integral in its development.
For more information about Harvest for Health and to sign up for classes in the Chef Peter X. Kelly Teaching Kitchen, visit www.hvhc.org or call 914-734-3780.
 

Monday, 10 February 2014 15:47

Healthy Cooking Classes in February

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (Feb. 10, 2014) – Making some modest changes in your diet can improve your heart health. Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s new Peter X. Kelly Teaching Kitchen offers healthy cooking classes throughout the year and is offering some special classes in February in honor of National Heart Month.

Part of the Hospital’s Harvest for Health program, The Peter X. Kelly Teaching Kitchen offers cooking classes to people of all ages for a nominal fee of $15 per class. Here’s what’s on tap for February:
• Tuesday, February 11th. 2-3:30 PM. Lacto-fermentation. What’s lacto-fermentation? It’s the process that turns raw cabbage into sauerkraut or kimchi, or turns milk into yogurt. It’s a great way to preserve foods, and more and more research suggests that the probiotics in fermented foods can be good for your health. This class will be led by Chef Noah Sheetz. Noah is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America and spent many years as the Executive Chef to the Governors of New York State. Now, Chef Noah serves as the Executive Chef for Hudson Valley Hospital Center. ($15).

• Wednesday, February 12th. 11 AM – 1PM. Homemade Baby Food. Are you a new mom or dad who wants to save money and feed your baby the most nutritious foods you can? Come and take part in an informative discussion and recipe demonstration designed to help you provide the best care for your baby. We’ll talk about tips for making and storing great baby food, nutrition, and easy recipes that will make feeding your child fun and simple. ($15).

• Tuesday, February 18th. 5-6:30 PM. Snacks for the Heart. Those middle of the day hunger pangs can be hard to resist, but we don’t need to ruin our heart health when we reach for a snack. This class will give you easy recipes for quick snacks for your home or to have on the go. We’ll also talk about what it means to eat for your heart and what common snacks we try to avoid. ($15).

• Tuesday, February 25th. 2-3:30 PM. Nourishing Loved Ones Undergoing Cancer Treatment. If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with cancer, choosing meals that were once a simple part of life, may have significantly changed. This class will explore multiple methods for preparing nutritious foods for those with reduced appetite; experience an altered sense of taste, or having difficulty swallowing. It will allow you to taste test novel ingredients and practice cooking techniques to create and fortify everyday foods. ($15).


February is National Heart Month. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), you can reduce your risk of heart disease by making simple lifestyle changes such as eating healthier, increasing physical activity and not smoking.

For more information on cooking classes, call 914-734-3780 or click here to register on line.


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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

 

Tuesday, 04 February 2014 18:29

Love Your Heart at HVHC’s Healthy Heart Fair

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (Feb. 4, 2014) – Hudson Valley Hospital Center (HVHC) wants you to love your heart this February with free screenings and healthy heart activities.

Visit the main lobby of the hospital on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and meet with health care professionals who can provide information on cholesterol, blood pressure exercise and nutrition. Here’s some of the highlights:
• A cardiologist from NYU Hudson Valley Cardiology will be on hand to answer questions.
• Staff from the Hospital’s cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation department will conduct blood pressure screenings and cardio assessments.
• Staff from the Hospital’s new Chef Peter X. Kelly Teaching Kitchen and Cura, the hospital’s food service, will offer healthy cooking tips and snacks.
• Ellen Forman, CYT of Prana Moon Yoga will demonstrate seated Yoga.
• The Wellness Club will do a body fat analysis
• Smoking cessation counselors will answer questions and provide information.

February is National Heart Month when health professionals raise awareness about heart disease prevention. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, for both men and women. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), you can reduce your risk by making simple lifestyle changes such as eating healthier, increasing physical activity and not smoking.

For more information on the Healthy Heart Fair at Hudson Valley Hospital Center, please call 914-734-3557. The event is free and open to the public.
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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

 

Thursday, 30 January 2014 13:10

Snow Blower Injuries on the Rise


Cortlandt Manor, NY - (January 30, 2014) –Hudson Valley residents have had to clear away a lot of snow this winter, resulting in many opportunities for winter accidents.

While snow blowers are an essential tool at this time of year, their use also results in many hand injuries.

Dr. Ari Mayerfield of Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s Hand Center said that every year he sees patients who suffer from a variety of injuries sustained from snow blowers.

“Due to the improper handling of these machines, patients suffer from fingertip injuries, fractures, lacerations and amputated digits,’’ said Mayerfield, a surgeon who specializes in injuries to the hand and upper extremity. Dr. Mayerfield works with hand therapists at the hospital’s Center for Rehabilitation to help those injured return to normal function.

Dr. Mayerfield said he would prefer to see people avoid injuries to start with. He said that a majority of injuries with snow blowers are caused when people try to clear clogs in the exit chute without turning off the machine.

“When snow becomes clogged in the exit chute of the machine, it causes a jam. The operator will then inspect the blower, and this is when the majority of injuries occur. The operator's hand will come in contact with the rotating blades while using his/her hand to clear the snow,” he said.

He suggested that snow blower users follow these tips:
• Turn off the machine
• Wait for a minute to give the blades time to stop rotating
• Keep your hands clear of the exit chute and blades
• NEVER use your hands to clear the snow - use a stick to clear the clogged chute
• Keep snowblower safety shields in place
• Never allow children to use the snowblower

Nefretiri Butcher, an occupational therapist with HVHC’s Hand Center, said even those who use low-tech snow removing equipment are subject to injuries of the hand and back if they don’t take proper precautions. She suggests that those shoveling snow should follow these tips:


• Shovel fresh snow: Fresh powdery snow is easier to shovel than the wet, packed-down variety.
• Push the snow as you shovel: It's easier on your back than lifting the snow out of the way.
• Don't pick up too much at once: Use a light shovel (e.g. aluminum). Use a small shovel, or fill only one-fourth or one-half of a large one.
• Lift with your legs bent, not your back. Keep your back straight. By bending and "sitting" into the movement, you'll keep your spine upright and less stressed. Your shoulders, torso and thighs can do the work for you.

If you have a hand or wrist issue either routine or emergency, you can contact Dr. Mayerfield at (914) 293-8700. If you need hand therapy call the Hand Center at 914-734-3251.

 

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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org.
 

Friday, 24 January 2014 16:46

Children of Haiti

Dr. Kerline Marceln has been writing to Hudson Valley Hospital Center to tell us about her mission to Haiti since she left here on Jan. 18. Dr. Marcelin is working at the Sacred Heart Hospital in Milot, Haiti where she and a team of eye surgeons are working to restore the sight of children and adults who could not otherwise afford treatment. They are also working to mentor local surgeons so that they can treat the local population after the visitors leave. Here are some or her texts.

 

Despite the poverty that most Haitians face. They dress neatly for school in their uniforms. I often saw them heading to school, walking over many miles to get to school, and many can be found doing homework at night on the street, under the outdoor street lights because of a lack of indoor lights.

These people need just so much! There's so many displaced kids since the quake. There's a few  kids in the street  ( ranging -age 6-12)  that I gave a couple of lollipops that my staff supplied me with from back home. Every  morning on my way to the hospital, there's always a small growing crowd of kids outside of my residence. They are sweet, endearing, and they are always on the streets. I inquired about why they aren't  in school and they say , "schools closed for strike, because teachers haven't been paid in months" Others say both their patents are dead from the Cholera that struck the town immediately after the quake! These kids get ecstatic over just one little lollipop. As soon as I walk out of the residence I hear these kids calling to me "Hey it's Dr. Kerl" "any sweet?" , and they always ask for extras for whatever friends that aren't with them . 

 

 

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (January 23, 2014) – Three people from the community and a group of Hudson Valley Hospital Center employees were honored today for acts of kindness when the Hospital kicked off a year-long celebration of its 125th Anniversary.
More than 100 people packed the hospital lobby for a presentation of the Hospital’s “Acts of Kindness Awards” presented by HVHC President John C. Federspiel. Recognized at the event were: Nancy Montgomery and her husband the late Jim Lovell of Cold Spring. Lovell, who died in the Metro North train derailment last month, was recognized posthumously as part of the Hospital 125th Anniversary’s theme – 125 Acts of Kindness. Also honored were Ellen Buccatello of Peekskill, an advocate for the homeless and hungry, chaplain and member of the Hospital’s Ethics Committee, and a team of employees who head the Hospital’s annual Santa’s Helpers holiday gift drive. Buccellato’s award was accepted by her fellow chaplain Barbara Walker as Buccellato was traveling with her friend Collette Carpenter, who accompanied the body of her son Army Pilot Clayton Carpenter back home. Carpenter died recently in a tragic helicopter accident in Georgia.
“Kindness is at the heart of everything we do so I am very pleased that we have chosen Acts of Kindness as our theme for this 125th Anniversary Celebration,’’ said Edward B. MacDonald Jr., Chairman of the Board of Directors. “I am very proud to be a part of this Hospital family. It is a very special place that combines medical excellence with a caring, community spirit.”
Hudson Valley Hospital Center was opened in 1889 in the City of Peekskill after a group of community minded women raised $1,800 to purchase property on lower South Street. The hospital was known as the Helping Hand Hospital until 1911 when it was incorporated as Peekskill Hospital. In 1966, the hospital moved to its current location in Cortlandt Manor. It was renamed Hudson Valley Hospital Center in 1992 to reflect its new status as a regional facility.

WHUD’s Kacey Morabito Grean served as Mistress of Ceremonies at the event and there was a performance by violinist Daisy Jopling. Public officials including Westchester County Health Commissioner Sherlita Amler and mayors and supervisors of Peekskill, Cold Spring, Cortlandt Manor and Yorktown attended.
Federspiel said that those honored at the event served as role models for the community and encouraged others to perform acts of kindness. At the event, the community asked to pledge to perform at least one act of kindness in 2014. As part of the on-going “Act of Kindness” campaign pledges will be featured on Facebook and the Hospital website. To learn more about HVHC’s Act of Kindness campaign, visit www.hvhc.org or e-mail your pledge to JLIB_HTML_CLOAKING .


Bios of honorees at HVHC’s 125th Anniversary Event:


• Nancy Montgomery and Jim Lovell have served the Cold Spring community both as volunteers and public servants. Nancy, a Philipstown Councilwoman, served on the Recreation Commission and as a volunteer with the Ambulance Corp. Even after being elected to public office, Nancy continued to volunteer at senior luncheons, fundraising events and family nights. Nancy has a deep connection with older adults, and was well known for this ability when she served on the Ambulance Corp. She and Jim were active in Philipstown’s Depot Theater for many years. Music was at the center of both their lives, and they shared this love by bringing music into the community. Nancy was more visibly active in town, but after her husband Jim died last month in the Metro North train derailment, there was an outpouring of testimonials from the community about the Jim’s quiet contributions. Nancy has received thousands of cards and e-mails telling of Jim’s deeds whether it was encouraging a child on the soccer field or volunteering at a school event. Jim was truly a kind person who touched the lives of so many in his quiet way.

• Ellen Buccellato is a dedicated and energetic person who has given countless hours of her time to the community and to Hudson Valley Hospital Center. An advocate for the homeless and hungry, she is currently chairperson of Caring for the Homeless of Peekskill (CHOP.) CHOP has helped thousands to overcome hunger and homelessness through its shelter and feeding programs including the Jan Peek House Shelter for the Homeless, Sunny Donut Free Breakfast Program, and Fred’s Pantry at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church. Ellen has been very active in the Chaplaincy Program at Hudson Valley Hospital Center over the years. She’s been a representative for chaplains on HVHC’s Ethics Committee and HVHC’s Palliative Care Team. In collaboration with the hospital, Ellen organized a coat drive which collected over 200 coats for men, women and children. And under Ellen’s guidance, hospital employees donated non-perishable food items, toiletries, and new undergarments/socks. All items were distributed at the Jan Peek House Shelter for the homeless. Ellen is an active member of PAPA (Peekskill Area Pastors’ Association). She was inducted into the Westchester County Senior Citizens’ Hall of Fame in 2009.

• Santa’s Helpers was started 18 years ago when Hospital President John C. Federspiel suggested that instead of exchanging gifts, employees should start a fund to benefit the less fortunate. From that time on, the program was adopted by hospital employees, volunteers, physicians, board members and the entire hospital family. Each year, HVHC raises funds to buy $125 worth gifts each for a minimum of 100 children. From soliciting and reviewing the wish lists to fund raising, shopping and wrapping the presents, Santa’s Helpers has done extraordinary things. The program has raised about $250,000 over the years and provided a very happy holiday for more than 2,000 children. So many people have been involved in this program over the years it would be hard to name them all. Committee members are Sue Lepore, Denise Pilla, Rebecca Bowen, Debbie Petranchik and Maureen DiMaggio.

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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

 

 

Wednesday, 22 January 2014 17:23

Acts of Kindness

Acts of Kindness do make a difference. That's why Hudson Valley Hospital Center in celebration of its 125th Anniversary is asking the community to perform acts of kindness.

Small gestures go a long way: a smile, a compliment, giving someone the right of way on the road, giving up your seat on the subway. These small acts, restore our faith in humanity and lighten our daily load.

So we are challenging people to pledge to perform more acts of kindness in the New Year. Our goal is 125, but the sky is the limit. Afterall, it was an act of kindness that started the Hospital in 1889 when a small group of community-minded women purchased a pre-revolutionary house on lower South Street in Peekskill, which became the Helping Hand Hospital. And Hudson Valley has dedicated itself to fullfilling that 'Helping Hand' mission ever since.

Click here for some ideas for Random Acts of Kindness.

Acts of Kindness pledge forms are available at Hudson Valley Hospital Center and at area businesses in Peekskill, Cortlandt Manor and Yorktown. Fill out a form and we'll post it on our Acts of Kindness Wall. You can also e-mail us your Act of Kindness at JLIB_HTML_CLOAKING . Look for our HVHC 125h banners in your community.

 

Hudson Valley Hospital Center thanks its donors for supporting campaigns and events that helped us to develop and maintain important programs and services in 2013.

The big event of the year was Harvest of the Hudson Valley, a farm-to-table diner held at Glynwood Farm, a non-profit educational farm in Cold Spring whose mission is innovation in sustainable agricultural practice. It was the perfect setting for Chef Peter X. Kelly to cater the event. During the evening, a generous donor announced a significant gift naming the hospital’s new teaching kitchen for the Iron Chef winner.  Proceeds from the event, $265,000 as well as grants, including one from Newman Own Foundation, funded the construction of the new kitchen located at the Dempsey House on the hospital’s campus.

Later in the fall, the foundation hosted its annual Wine Tasting Event at Trump National Country Club in Briarcliff Manor, raising $27,000 to fund ongoing education and research by the physicians at the hospital’s Ashikari Breast Center. Proceeds from last year’s event were used to host 60 area surgical oncologists at an educational symposium at Arrowwood Conference Center in September 2013.

Finally, donors generously supported the foundation’s Building On Excellence Phase 2 Campaign which enhances the programs and services of the Cheryl R. Lindenbaum Cancer Center.

In this changing health care environment, philanthropy has become more important than ever for hospitals. The hospital’s Foundation provides donors access to many resources to help them make charitable gift decisions that can have significant tax benefits.  For more information, call the Foundation at 914-734-3526.

Tuesday, 07 January 2014 16:54

Avoid Hypothermia and Falls in Deep Freeze

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (January 7, 2014) – An arctic weather system that has dropped temperatures into the single digits is causing dangerous outdoor conditions in our area. Physicians at Hudson Valley Hospital Center are recommending some steps to help the public take extra precautions against the cold.

Dr. Barry Geller on staff in the Emergency Department at Hudson Valley Hospital Center said people who work outdoors, the elderly and children are at higher risk of hypothermia, a condition where the body temperature drops to dangerous levels.

“Keeping warm is especially important when the temperatures drop so low,’’ said Dr. Geller. “Limit the amount of time spent outdoors, but if you must go out dress in layers and wear a hat.”

Wearing several layers of clothing helps to insulate your body by trapping warm, dry air inside and wearing a hat is important since the head and neck lose heat faster than any other part of the body.

He said for those who work outdoors frostbite is an added danger. The cheeks, ear and nose and fingers are most prone to frostbite so those areas should be well-protected against the cold.

Signs of frostbite include white, waxy or grayish-yellow patches on the affected areas. The skin may feel cold and numb. If you suspect frostbite, get out of the cold and to a warm place immediately, remove clothing or jewelry that may be reducing circulation and seek medical attention.


Slips and falls are among some of the other more frequently seen injuries in emergency rooms this time of year. Dr. Geller said that more than a dozen accidents related to slips on the ice were seen at HVHC during the past few days, mostly hip and wrist fractures. Wearing proper shoes and making sure that walkways and steps are cleared and salted are the best way to avoid injuries.


Dr. Ari Mayerfield, hand surgeon at Hudson Valley Hospital Center, said that broken wrists often result in falls because people will instinctively reach out to with their hands to break a fall.


“This time of year, particularly when there is a lot of black ice in extreme temperatures as we have now, it is not unusual for people to be injured in falls,’’ said Dr. Mayerfield. “Getting the right treatment and quickly is very important.”


Dr. Mayerfield said that a broken arm or wrist bone will be extremely painful and there may also be swelling and tenderness. The best thing to do is to seek medical attention. You should first stabilize the arm with a sling and apply an ice pack to the area. A bag of frozen peas wrapped in a towel works well. The only way to really be sure if there is a break is with an X-ray.


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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care