Victoria Hochman

Victoria Hochman

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (September 5, 2013) – If we are lucky, we will all grow old someday. But until we get there, most of us have no idea of the challenges that older adults face in their day to day lives.

On October 1, Hudson Valley Hospital Center will host a unique kind of health fair: one that illustrates in an interactive way, what it’s like to get old, and what we can do to help older adults – who are living longer - maintain their quality of life. “The Silver Lining Health Aging Fair” from 9 a.m. to noon in the Hospital lobby will feature interactive exhibits as well as educational information for seniors and caregivers on the latest information about aging.

“What is it like when your hands are shaking and you have difficulty feeding yourself or you have trouble maintaining your balance?” said Suzanne Mateo, MA, BSN, RN, administrative director of nursing at Hudson Valley Hospital Center. “Those of us who are not older adults take for granted the freedom of movement, clear eyesight and mental acuity that we experience when we are younger. At Hudson Valley Hospital Center we want to educate the community on what it means to get older and what those of us in healthcare are doing to help keep older adults independent and healthy.”

At the Silver Linings Health Aging Fair the public can try out new state of the art walkers as well as weighted eating utensils and glasses that simulate vision with cataracts among other interactive activities. Seniors can received free flu shots and blood pressure screenings as well as connect with participating agencies including the Visiting Nurse Service of Hudson Valley, the Visiting Nurse Service of Westchester, Bethel Homes, Atria Senior Living and Drum Hill Senior Living Communities, Leave the Light on Foundation Caregivers Support group. The day will also feature giveaways, raffle prizes and refreshments donated by Shoprite.

Maggie Adler, HVHC’s Associate Director of Quality and Standardsat HVHC, said the Hospital hopes that seniors and families can take away with them many of the practices used by the hospital and its NICHE program to keep older adults happy and healthy longer.

The premise of NICHE is simple: Keep older adults from getting sicker while in the Hospital and teach them and their families how to keep them healthy once they are out. That means keeping them up and moving around so they don't lose mobility and become prone to infections; keeping them mentally active with conversation and activities and helping them to stay hydrated and well nourished.

NICHE or Nursing Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders is the only national geriatric initiative to improve care of older hospitalized adults. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is one of the country’s 300 NICHE hospitals.

People over 65 are the fastest growing age group in the nation, making up 12.9 percent of the population or about 1 in 8 people in the United States. By 2030, estimates are that there will be about 72.1 million older adults, according to U.S. Census data.

An aging population contributes to the rising cost of healthcare. Much of this is because people over 85 spend a lot of time in and out of hospitals. As a result, their health continues to deteriorate unless something is done while they are in the hospital to keep them active and interested.

                                                             ###

Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community.  In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs.  Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

 

 

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (August 9, 2013)– In keeping with its new initiatives to promote healthy eating, Hudson Valley Hospital Center will hold a unique, farm-to-table event that celebrates local farms and encourages people to eat locally for improved health.

Tickets are now on sale for “Harvest of the Hudson Valley.” The event, at Glynwood Farm in Cold Spring on Sept. 27, will honor Chef Peter X. Kelly, Joseph Pallante A.I.A and Elliott Sumers, M.D.  The evening will feature cocktails, dinner and a silent auction. All proceeds will benefit the new demonstration and teaching kitchen at Hudson Valley Hospital Center. This year’s program Mistress of Ceremonies will be Fox News Channel weather personality Janice Dean. "Iron Chef'  winner Kelly and his staff will be preparing the food for the event.

“Instead of holding our annual Gala this year, Hudson Valley Hospital Center chose to hold a farm-to-table celebration that was more reflective of our new mission: ‘Sanitas per escam’ or ‘health through food.’ Hudson Valley Hospital Center believes it has a responsibility to incorporate nutrition into every medical care plan of every diagnosis treated, and to hopefully discharge patients with a better understanding of why their diet is so very important to their health,” said Hudson Valley Hospital Center President John C. Federspiel.

Construction of a teaching/demonstration kitchen is underway in the historic Dempsey House on the Pataki Center campus adjacent to the Hospital. HVHC will offer cooking classes and community programs for patients and community members young and old. The goal is to help people learn to prepare healthier meals at home. Restauranter Kelly of Xavier’s X20 is working with the Hospital and has drafted the concept and design of the kitchen. His passion, knowledge and community spirit are the driving force behind this project. 

The teaching/demonstration kitchen is the final piece in a multi-faceted plan to highlight nutrition as an integral part of healthcare. In April 2012, the Hospital opened its “Seeds for Health” Organic Garden followed by the opening of a Farmers’ Market that same year. In 2013, the markets were expanded to twice a month and the Hospital implemented a new food service, Cura Hospitality, which features locally sourced foods as well as from scratch cooking. 

A participant in HVHC’s Farmers’ Markets, Glynwood Farm has provided the community with educational and sustainable farming programs since 1929 and has worked to strengthen our regional food system throughout the Hudson Valley.

Tickets to “Harvest of the Hudson Valley” are $600 and seating is limited. For further information and to reserve tickets visit www.hvhc.orgor call the Hospital’s Foundation at 734-3526.

                                                             ###

Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community.  In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs.  Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

 

 

Wednesday, 07 August 2013 10:49

Meet HVHC's Amazing Women at Woman Fest

On August 8-9 Hudson Valley Hospital Center will be participating in Woman Fest, a two-day festival in celebration of women organized by HG Fairfield Arts Center for the Environment.  It is not a coincidence that the Hospital has decided to be a part of this day because when you think about healthcare, you can't help but connect it to women. Women tend to be caregivers and nurturers and thus gravitate to the healing professions. We have so many amazing women here at Hudson Valley Hospital Center that we could have a Woman Fest of our own celebrating all that they do for their colleagues and their patients.

Here are in my mind just a few that should be celebrated:

OB-GYN Dr. Meedlen Charles spent five years in Afghanistan. In July 2005 Dr. Charles joined the Army and served as active duty military physician at Ft Riley, KS. In 2007 she was deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. After returning from Afghanistan in 2008 she was appointed Chief of the OB/GYN department at Irwin Army Community Hospital in Ft Riley, KS. Dr. Charles still serves in the reserves. She will be at Woman Fest on Friday, August 9 to talk about her experiences and all the meaningful work she does treating women in her practice.
Dr. Charles’ colleague Joanne Mazzio, CNM, NP, MS, is another amazing woman who has dedicated her life to caring for women. After serving her home community of the Bronx as a public health nurse, she went on to work at Westchester Medical Center’s high risk maternity unit to gain the experience and skills that would serve as a foundation for her career as a midwife For the past 16 years she has served this community, following a personalized and holistic model of care. She has worked with women, their mothers, daughters and friends; touching the lives of many in the Hudson Valley. She will be at Woman Fest Thursday and Friday, talking to women about their health concerns.

Also attending Woman Fest on Friday, is a newcomer to Hudson Valley Hospital Center, Dr. Maddalena Duarte. Dr. Duarte comes to us from Yale New Haven Hospital where she did her fellowship on breast and body imaging. Dr .Duarte conducted research on the latest screening techniques including tomosynthesis or 3-D mammography, which is now available at HVHC and has given radiologists like Dr. Duarte additional tools to detect breast cancer earlier.

I hope everyone will attend this special two day festival, dedicated to the lives and concerns of women and meet some of the amazing women on staff at HVHC.  Look for us at the Women’s Health tent.

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (July 24, 2013)– Hendrick Hudson Library came to the rescue this week, donating hard to find children’s books for kids coping with a family member who has cancer.

The Hospital has received hundreds of children’s books since it appealed for donations back in March for its new Kid 2 Kid Cancer Support program, but very few were related to cancer. The program – run by Gilda’s Club of Westchester and offered at the hospital’s Cheryl R. Lindenbaum Cancer Center on the third Thursday of each month – provides support for children 5-12 with loved ones who are diagnosed with cancer.

“We are very moved by this donation,’’ said Anne Campbell Maxwell, Director of Oncology Services at the Cheryl R. Lindenbaum Cancer Center. “These books were specially purchased for us and the children’s librarian, Terri Jersey, went above and beyond researching titles that were particularly relevant. They are lovely books.’’

For more information on cancer support programs offered by Gilda’s Club at HVHC, call call Miranda Dold, LCSW at 914-644-8844.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cortlandt Manor NY – (July 23)- It’s not your grandmother’s hospital food. Taste what chefs at Hudson Valley Hospital Center are cooking up now that they’ve switched to a new food service that offers from scratch cooking, using seasonal ingredients.

Extending its healthy eating initiatives, Hudson Valley Hospital Center announced Cura Hospitality as its new food services partner in May. Cura now provides food services for the hospital’s patients as well as the hospital café, introducing a healthy, fresh and locally sourced dining experience.

“Cura’s passion for chef-inspired menus, scratch cooking and their sustainable practices through its FarmSource program, clearly define their homegrown and healthy approach to dining.  They partner with some of the finest local farms and food producers and they support our Harvest for Health program, which promotes field to plate meals for patient therapeutic care,” said Hudson Valley Hospital President John Federspiel. 

Chef Noah Sheetz of Cura Hospitality showed off Cura’s food on Tuesday with a tasting and cooking demonstration at the Hospital’s Farmers’ Market. Chef Sheetz prepared tomato and corn salad as well as blueberry sorbet.

“These are all ingredients that are being sold at local farms at this time and can be found right here at Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s Farmers’ Market. The idea is to prepare foods when they are at their freshest,’’ said Sheetz.  

The new food service is part of the Hospital’s Harvest for Health program. The Hospital opened an organic garden last spring and this year is extended its on campus Farmers’ Markets to two days a month through November. All the initiatives are aimed at encouraging patients and people in the community to eat more fresh foods in place of processed foods high in salt, fat and preservatives.

Recipe for Tomato Corn Salad

1 large tomato or 1 cup cherry tomatoes

1 large ear of corn

1 large cucumber

 1 celery stalk

Fresh basil

Fresh Cilantro

1 clove garlic

1/4 cup lemon juice

2 Tbs extra virgin olive oil

Kosher salt

Cube tomato, cumber and dice celery (half cherry tomatoes). Cut raw corn off cob. Finely chop garlic, cilantro and basil. Put ingredients in bowl. Mix lemon juice and olive oil and pour over salad. Add kosher salt to taste.

Wednesday, 17 July 2013 14:21

Westchester Medical Practice OB-GYN

 

Westchester Medical Practice’s OB-GYN practice prides itself on offering the most complete, compassionate women’s health care anywhere in the region. Whether you are an adolescent looking for your first gynecologist or a women looking for post-menopausal care, WMP’s practitioners will provide you with personalized, progressive care. They pride themselves on being an all-female, multi-cultural and multi-lingual practice with progressive views on women’s healthcare. They offer the latest in contraception and family-centered birthing. And because they are affiliated with Hudson Valley Hospital Center you can be assured that they practice in a state-of-the-art facility that has won awards for maternity care and has top technology for minimally invasive surgery.  

Visit our office in Cortlandt Manor at 1968 Crompond Road (at Hudson Valley Hospital Center) or in Putnam Valley at 205 Waterside Professional Park, 1259 Oregon Road. Call 914-736-6180 for an appointment in Cortlandt Manor and 914-528-7664 for an appointment in Putnam Valley.

Here are some of the areas they specialize in:

OB

-       Family-centered, natural birthing,

-       Offering, hypno-birthing, acupuncture in labor, water births, V-bac, doula-friendly

-       Midwives

 

GYN

-       Minimally invasive, in-office procedures  such as Essure permanent contraception and treatments for irregular bleeding

-       Adolescent GYN

-       Urinary incontinence

-       Contraception

-       Genetic Screening, BRCA analysis

-       Non invasive procedures

-       Hormonal issues: Bio-identical hormone replacement, peri-menopause, PMS

 

Meet our Team

Meedlen Charles, M.D.

Dr. Charles graduated Magna Cum Laude with a BS in chemistry from the College of Saint Elizabeth in Morristown, NJ. She later graduated from Drexel University School of Medicine in 2001. She went on to train at Beth Israel Medical Center in NYC where she acted a Chief Resident. Dr. Charles was nominated as Hudson Valley Hospital Center Physician of the Quarter in March 2012.

In July 2005 Dr. Charles joined the Army and served as active duty military physician at Ft Riley, KS. In 2007 she was deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. After returning from Afghanistan in 2008 she was appointed Chief of the OB/GYN department at Irwin Army Community Hospital in Ft Riley, KS.

Dr Charles is board certified in general Obstetrics and Gynecology. She manages normal as well as high risk obstetrics complicated by hypertension, gestational diabetes, twin pregnancies. She is interested in VBAC, water births (first delivery at Hudson Valley Hospital was a water birth). She also works in conjuction with doulas. She offers a wide range of services in gynecology including minimally invasive laparascopic surgery, family planning and contraception, adolescent health counseling, menopausal management, urinary incontinence and infertility. She provides outpatient office procedures such as Essure vaginal sterilization, endometrial ablation, hysteroscopy.

Sheila Pongnon, M.D.

Sheila D. Pongnon is a board certified OB/GYN and a fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. She has been practicing medicine in the Westchester area for the past ten years. Dr. Pongnon received her undergraduate degree in chemistry from New York University and her medical degree from the State University of New York – Downstate Medical Center. She completed her OB/GYN training at New York Medical College – Westchester Medical Center.

Dr. Pongnon has extensive surgical training and offers advanced pelvic and minimally invasive surgery including laparoscopic and hysteroscopic surgery. Dr. Pongnon is certified in the use of the da Vinci robotic-assisted surgical system and uses this technology in performing hysterectomies. She also provides general obstetrics and gynecology care, including low-risk and high-risk obstetrics, contraception management, adolescent and menopausal treatment.

 

Joanne Mazzio, CNM, NP, MS

Joanne Mazzio graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Lehman College of the City University of N.Y. where her initial interest in women’s health care and midwifery was sparked. After serving her home community of the Bronx as a public health nurse, she went on to work at Westchester Medical Center’s high risk maternity unit to gain the experience and skills that would serve as a foundation for her career as a midwife. Joanne graduated with honors from the Midwifery Education Program at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of NJ and later completed her Masters Degree in Midwifery at Downstate University. Joanne initially worked in North Central Bronx Hospital where she headed the Adolescent Prenatal Program and provided care to underserved women and teens in childbirth. After 7 years, she went on to join a private practice providing full scope midwifery care, including both well woman gynecology and obstetrical care to the women of Westchester County.

Dedicated to a personalized and holistic model of care, she has been honored to care for these women, their mothers, daughters and friends; touching the lives of the Hudson Valley community for the past 16 years.

Joanne is excited to be part of the OB/GYN group of The Westchester Medical Practice in order to pursue her commitment to safe and compassionate midwifery care for women throughout their lives; from adolescence through menopause.

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (July 16, 2013) – As temperatures fall just short of the 100 degree mark this week officials from the New York State Governor on down are asking the public to take safety precautions against heat stroke and dehydration.

Dr. Ron Nutovits, Chair of Emergency Medicine at Hudson Valley Hospital Center, today had these suggestions for keeping cool in the face of the blistering weather.

“Of course when the temperatures climb this high we are worried about heat related illness,’’ said Dr. Nutovits. “The best scenario is prevention, and we are asking everyone to take precautions against heat stroke and dehydration.’’

Dr. Nutovits said that if possible people should stay indoors out of the heat.  If they do not have air conditioning in their homes, they can keep cool with a visit to the mall, movie theater or library.

“If you must be outdoors, stay in the shade and drink plenty of water. Avoid sugary or alcoholic beverages as they can worsen dehydration,’’ said Nutovits.

He added that it is especially important for children and the elderly to heed these warnings are they are more prone to heat stroke and dehydration.

Many local communities offer cooling centers. In Cortlandt Manor, seniors are welcome to cool off at the Muriel Morabito Community Center at 29 Westbrook Drive and in Yorktown at the Yorktown Community and Cultural Center at 174 Commerce Street. For a complete listing of area cooling centers, visit the Westchester County Health Department website or contact your local city or town hall.

 

 

                                                             ###

Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community.  In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs.  Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

 

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (July 11, 2013) – What are the most pressing health needs in your community? Hudson Valley Hospital Center wants to know.

As part of a state and federal push to improve health care, Hudson Valley Hospital Center is asking people in the community to complete a questionnaire to help assess what healthcare services are most needed.  To fill out the questionnaire click here.The survey is anonymous and does not require participants to give their names or contact information.

“Hudson Valley Hospital Center has been meeting the health needs of our community for nearly 125 years,’’ said Hudson Valley Hospital Center President John Federspiel. “We want to make sure that we continue to meet those needs. We ask that the public devote five minutes to take this brief survey to help us understand how we can best serve them.’’

The questionnaire is being done in partnership with the Westchester County Department of Health and hospitals countywide as part of an initiative called Working Together Toward a Healthier Westchester. The goal is to meet new state and federal healthcare standards that require hospitals to come up with cooperative health improvement plans with input from the community. A half-day health planning summit will be held on August 15 with agencies throughout Westchester to discuss health planning as part of this initiative. 

For more information on the survey or to have a hard copy mailed to you, please call 914-734-3794.

                                                             ###

Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community.  In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs.  Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

 

 

With summer in full-swing, Hudson Valley Hospital Center's Farmer's Market is coming into its own with a larger selection of fresh produce from local farms. If you're at a loss for how to prepare some of the produce on sale, Michael Bulger, our Farmers' Market manager, has some suggestions for you.  Here’s is blog item on how to use Garlic Scapes.

 

For a long time, it was common practice for farmers to toss garlic scapes into the compost pile. These stalks are the tops of garlic plants, and they are usually chopped off so that the garlic bulbs grow larger. Thankfully, someone pointed out that scapes are really good to eat.
Now you can find garlic scapes for sale in farmers’ markets during in June or July. They taste garlicky, but won’t be as pungent as traditional garlic. If they’re tender (look for the curved tops), you can chop them up and eat them in a salad.
Toughened garlic scapes can be cooked as you would asparagus, or roasted inside a whole chicken. As scape season soon ends, those who are fond of the stalks may want to freeze some for later use. Try floating them into a winter soup.
For now, whip up some garlic scape pesto, and then toss with vegetables for a delicious summer side:

Makes about 3 cups of pesto.
Ingredients:
•20 large garlic scapes
•1/3 c pine nuts (can also use pistachios)
•1/2 c grated Parmesan cheese
•Kosher salt and black pepper
•2/3 c extra-virgin olive oil

In a food processor or blender, puree the garlic scapes, nuts, Parmesan, ¼ tsp salt, and ¼ tsp black pepper until chopped fine.

Continue pureeing while slowly drizzling in oil. If there is no opening on your machine, you might have to stop and add a little bit of oil at a time. Puree until the pesto is smooth and all ingredients are incorporated.

The pesto will keep in the refrigerator for up to a week, if covered. It lasts at least a month if frozen. When you’ve roasted or sautéed some vegetables, you can toss them in fresh or defrosted garlic scape pesto.

In addition to being delicious, garlic scapes pack in some great nutrients. Scapes will provide a surprisingly large amount of calcium and vitamin C. One cup of garlic scapes even provides more protein than a cup of milk.
Fun Fact: Garlic has been around since the ancient Egyptians built the pyramids, and garlic breath has been making daters self-conscious for at least part of that time. But, recent studies have shown that a glass of milk can reduce garlic-induced halitosis. For those who don’t drink milk, some people suggest chewing on parsley, drinking minty tea, or just waiting until later to steal a kiss. 

 

 

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (July 2, 2013) –  Art lovers can enjoy the sights of summer indoors at Hudson Valley Hospital Center where the Hospital's Art for Health program is now featuring its latest exhibition, “Shades of Summer.”

The exhibit, which showcases the works of seven local artists, is on display from now until August 29 as part of the Hospital’s “Art for Health” program curated by artist and hospital Curator, Suzanne Bohrer Ashley.

The 85 works on display give diverse interpretations of nature's seasons and include bronze wall sculptures, oil and acrylic paintings, hand dyed/torn paper collages, and photographs. The exhibit can be viewed by the public from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily in the lobby gallery and along the main corridors of the Hospital. Visitors may also view the permanent “Art for Health” collection, which includes 250 pieces of original art throughout other public areas of the hospital

About the Artists featured in “Shades of Summer” :

Barbara Korman,maintains a studio in Westchester and New York City for the design and production of three-dimensional constructions, unique cast bronzes and wood installations. She has traveled extensively- from the National Parks in the United States to the Himalayas in Nepal - collecting regional art and making photographic notations of the land's textures and formations. “My work is informed by nature but not necessarily about nature. I want to create a dialogue between the visual, physical and emotional qualities that are inherent in space, form, texture, line and color,’’ she says.  Korman’s award winning works have been exhibited and collected worldwide in more than 100 solo and group shows at leading museums and galleries, including the Neuberger Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Grounds for Sculpture, Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, Katonah Museum of Art, Olivetti-Rome, and Tiffany and Company’s Fifth Avenue windows. A graduate of New York City's High School of Music and Art, she earned her Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Fine Arts at the New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred University. For more information on Korman, visit, www.bkormanstudio.com

 

 Photographer Vito Pasquale’s series Some Things We Both Might Have Missed, focuses on everyday objects and places presented through a different perspective. The large-scale composite photographs featured in the exhibition are comprised of dozens of small, connected moments, intricate recreations of familiar spaces. “If we wanted, we could go to these places right now. In fact, if we’d had the chance, I’d have preferred that we’d been there together when the photographs were taken," says Pasquale. Most of the images have a single point of focus: a hand tool, a lawn chair, a watering can, a flowerpot, a rowboat, a light bulb, a stone wall. “These are quiet places and subdued colors. They are places where your grandparents went to school, where children learned to swim, where we learned to read and you caught your first sunny and finally, the street where we live,’’ he said  Pasquale lives in Mount Kisco with his wife and two sons.  For more information on his work, visit, www.vitopasquale.blogspot.com.

 

 Chad Wallaceis an award-winning artist from Westchester County. He has illustrated eight books for children including: Earth Feeling, The Heat (2010) and Seahorses (2012). He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts at Syracuse University (1997) and received his Master of Fine Arts degree from FIT (2011).“For as long as I can remember I wanted to be a professional artist,’’ said Wallace. “Ok, there was a brief period when I was nine years old when I wanted to be a paleontologist, but who didn’t? I quickly discovered though, that what I enjoyed about dinosaurs most was drawing them. It was my first and last career change." His large illustrations feature animals in their natural environments and display his interest in re-imagining children’s storytelling for the digital age. In a fast-paced, ever changing field, authors/Illustrators are being forced to adapt to new markets/media. “As technologies such as the I-phone and I-Pad continue to evolve, the demand for creative imagery and practical teaching applications will also increase,” he said. It is in that spirit that he has written The Meadow Mouse, a book/app currently in production with Dawn Publications. It is scheduled for release in Spring 2014. Chad resides in Westchester County, NY with his wife. To see more of his work visit, www.chadwallace.com

Artist and deceased Harrison native Marilyn Cohen's work has been collected in the National Archives of the Smithsonian. Her work, including watercolor-dyed torn paper collages, is inspired by oral histories and old photos and is her attempt to capture and preserve American history. Her large collages appear to be delicate watercolor paintings, but are really bits of color-drenched fragments of torn paper. Cohen had a varied background and designed greeting cards, wallpaper and fabric patterns, as well as, illustrated children's books. She also designed and supervised the production of a successful line of adult board games. Cohen was born and raised in New York City and attended the School of Visual Arts. She met her husband, Lewis, while at college and they moved to Westchester to raise their three children.  For more about Cohen’s work, visit www.marilyncohenartist.com.

 

Linda Puiattipaints primarily with oils on canvas. These include field studies painted outdoors in the Hudson Valley, the farmlands of Belgium and France and the coast of Cape Cod She uses color, light and shadow to express a strong connection with nature and the drama of a moment. Her paintings seek to create an emotional connection and encourage viewers to reflect.  She is a true colorist, using point and counterpoint to create strong and bold images of peaceful settings in a contemporary style.  Puiatti’s paintings are part of private collections throughout the US, Europe and Africa. Her American studies include The Art Students League, The School of Visual Arts, The Woodstock School of Art, and the Byrdcliffe School of Art and European studies include Stedelijke Akademie voor Schoone Kunst, Deinze, Belgium.  Her work has been shown in numerous galleries nationally and internationally and are included in many private collections.  www.lindapuiatti.com

Andrea Gellerstudied painting at Cornell University and Parsons School of Design. After a successful career as a freelance illustrator and graphic designer, with clients that included the New York Times, Washington Post and Psychology Today, she earned her MFA in painting from William Paterson University. She has had solo and two person exhibits at Johnson & Johnson, NJ, Ramapo College of NJ and Riverside Gallery, NJ. She has participated in numerous group shows in New York and across the United States. Recently, her work was selected by designer Michael Graves to participate in the West Windsor Arts Festival. Her painting “Floating” was selected by the US Ambassador, Daniel Speckhard, as part of a three year exhibition at the US Embassy in Athens, Greece, 2008. She has been teaching on the college level for over 15 years. “As a kinesthetic learner I have always explored the world through motion. My paintings, prints and drawings are a reflection of this as there is a quality of movement in the work. To learn more about Geller’s work, visit www.gellart.com

Growing up on Long Island and currently from Norwalk, CT, Paul Mindell knew instinctively as a child that he was an artist. Sixty years later, the Smithsonian selected him to exhibit in the National Portrait Gallery. He says, "my earliest works seemed to rival the walls of the caves of Lascaux." Mindell's work displayed at the hospital includes a series of oil paintings featuring cows, one of his favorite subjects, as well moody and dreamy landscapes with a contemporary flair. He has studied art at the Arts Students League, Silvermine Guild of Artists Rhode Island School of Design, University of Michigan School of Art & Design. In June 2009 he was selected by a Smithsonian jury as one of 49 artists, out of a field of 3,300, to exhibit in the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition at the National Portrait Gallery. Currently, he is a professor of art at Bergen Community College and has served as Visiting Artist at the College of New Rochelle. He is also a member of the Adjunct Art Faculty of the Rhode Island School of Design.  To learn more about Mindell’s work visit, www.paulmindell.com

Artists interested in exhibiting at the hospital should contact curator Suzanne Ashley at JLIB_HTML_CLOAKING Contributions of art are also welcome to be added to the hospital’s collection of about 300 original works in 17 gallery spaces throughout the campus.

 

                                                                                                       ###

Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community.  In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs.  Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org