Victoria Hochman

Victoria Hochman

Thursday, 30 January 2014 13:10

Snow Blower Injuries on the Rise


Cortlandt Manor, NY - (January 30, 2014) –Hudson Valley residents have had to clear away a lot of snow this winter, resulting in many opportunities for winter accidents.

While snow blowers are an essential tool at this time of year, their use also results in many hand injuries.

Dr. Ari Mayerfield of Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s Hand Center said that every year he sees patients who suffer from a variety of injuries sustained from snow blowers.

“Due to the improper handling of these machines, patients suffer from fingertip injuries, fractures, lacerations and amputated digits,’’ said Mayerfield, a surgeon who specializes in injuries to the hand and upper extremity. Dr. Mayerfield works with hand therapists at the hospital’s Center for Rehabilitation to help those injured return to normal function.

Dr. Mayerfield said he would prefer to see people avoid injuries to start with. He said that a majority of injuries with snow blowers are caused when people try to clear clogs in the exit chute without turning off the machine.

“When snow becomes clogged in the exit chute of the machine, it causes a jam. The operator will then inspect the blower, and this is when the majority of injuries occur. The operator's hand will come in contact with the rotating blades while using his/her hand to clear the snow,” he said.

He suggested that snow blower users follow these tips:
• Turn off the machine
• Wait for a minute to give the blades time to stop rotating
• Keep your hands clear of the exit chute and blades
• NEVER use your hands to clear the snow - use a stick to clear the clogged chute
• Keep snowblower safety shields in place
• Never allow children to use the snowblower

Nefretiri Butcher, an occupational therapist with HVHC’s Hand Center, said even those who use low-tech snow removing equipment are subject to injuries of the hand and back if they don’t take proper precautions. She suggests that those shoveling snow should follow these tips:


• Shovel fresh snow: Fresh powdery snow is easier to shovel than the wet, packed-down variety.
• Push the snow as you shovel: It's easier on your back than lifting the snow out of the way.
• Don't pick up too much at once: Use a light shovel (e.g. aluminum). Use a small shovel, or fill only one-fourth or one-half of a large one.
• Lift with your legs bent, not your back. Keep your back straight. By bending and "sitting" into the movement, you'll keep your spine upright and less stressed. Your shoulders, torso and thighs can do the work for you.

If you have a hand or wrist issue either routine or emergency, you can contact Dr. Mayerfield at (914) 293-8700. If you need hand therapy call the Hand Center at 914-734-3251.

 

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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org.
 

Friday, 24 January 2014 16:46

Children of Haiti

Dr. Kerline Marceln has been writing to Hudson Valley Hospital Center to tell us about her mission to Haiti since she left here on Jan. 18. Dr. Marcelin is working at the Sacred Heart Hospital in Milot, Haiti where she and a team of eye surgeons are working to restore the sight of children and adults who could not otherwise afford treatment. They are also working to mentor local surgeons so that they can treat the local population after the visitors leave. Here are some or her texts.

 

Despite the poverty that most Haitians face. They dress neatly for school in their uniforms. I often saw them heading to school, walking over many miles to get to school, and many can be found doing homework at night on the street, under the outdoor street lights because of a lack of indoor lights.

These people need just so much! There's so many displaced kids since the quake. There's a few  kids in the street  ( ranging -age 6-12)  that I gave a couple of lollipops that my staff supplied me with from back home. Every  morning on my way to the hospital, there's always a small growing crowd of kids outside of my residence. They are sweet, endearing, and they are always on the streets. I inquired about why they aren't  in school and they say , "schools closed for strike, because teachers haven't been paid in months" Others say both their patents are dead from the Cholera that struck the town immediately after the quake! These kids get ecstatic over just one little lollipop. As soon as I walk out of the residence I hear these kids calling to me "Hey it's Dr. Kerl" "any sweet?" , and they always ask for extras for whatever friends that aren't with them . 

 

 

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (January 23, 2014) – Three people from the community and a group of Hudson Valley Hospital Center employees were honored today for acts of kindness when the Hospital kicked off a year-long celebration of its 125th Anniversary.
More than 100 people packed the hospital lobby for a presentation of the Hospital’s “Acts of Kindness Awards” presented by HVHC President John C. Federspiel. Recognized at the event were: Nancy Montgomery and her husband the late Jim Lovell of Cold Spring. Lovell, who died in the Metro North train derailment last month, was recognized posthumously as part of the Hospital 125th Anniversary’s theme – 125 Acts of Kindness. Also honored were Ellen Buccatello of Peekskill, an advocate for the homeless and hungry, chaplain and member of the Hospital’s Ethics Committee, and a team of employees who head the Hospital’s annual Santa’s Helpers holiday gift drive. Buccellato’s award was accepted by her fellow chaplain Barbara Walker as Buccellato was traveling with her friend Collette Carpenter, who accompanied the body of her son Army Pilot Clayton Carpenter back home. Carpenter died recently in a tragic helicopter accident in Georgia.
“Kindness is at the heart of everything we do so I am very pleased that we have chosen Acts of Kindness as our theme for this 125th Anniversary Celebration,’’ said Edward B. MacDonald Jr., Chairman of the Board of Directors. “I am very proud to be a part of this Hospital family. It is a very special place that combines medical excellence with a caring, community spirit.”
Hudson Valley Hospital Center was opened in 1889 in the City of Peekskill after a group of community minded women raised $1,800 to purchase property on lower South Street. The hospital was known as the Helping Hand Hospital until 1911 when it was incorporated as Peekskill Hospital. In 1966, the hospital moved to its current location in Cortlandt Manor. It was renamed Hudson Valley Hospital Center in 1992 to reflect its new status as a regional facility.

WHUD’s Kacey Morabito Grean served as Mistress of Ceremonies at the event and there was a performance by violinist Daisy Jopling. Public officials including Westchester County Health Commissioner Sherlita Amler and mayors and supervisors of Peekskill, Cold Spring, Cortlandt Manor and Yorktown attended.
Federspiel said that those honored at the event served as role models for the community and encouraged others to perform acts of kindness. At the event, the community asked to pledge to perform at least one act of kindness in 2014. As part of the on-going “Act of Kindness” campaign pledges will be featured on Facebook and the Hospital website. To learn more about HVHC’s Act of Kindness campaign, visit www.hvhc.org or e-mail your pledge to JLIB_HTML_CLOAKING .


Bios of honorees at HVHC’s 125th Anniversary Event:


• Nancy Montgomery and Jim Lovell have served the Cold Spring community both as volunteers and public servants. Nancy, a Philipstown Councilwoman, served on the Recreation Commission and as a volunteer with the Ambulance Corp. Even after being elected to public office, Nancy continued to volunteer at senior luncheons, fundraising events and family nights. Nancy has a deep connection with older adults, and was well known for this ability when she served on the Ambulance Corp. She and Jim were active in Philipstown’s Depot Theater for many years. Music was at the center of both their lives, and they shared this love by bringing music into the community. Nancy was more visibly active in town, but after her husband Jim died last month in the Metro North train derailment, there was an outpouring of testimonials from the community about the Jim’s quiet contributions. Nancy has received thousands of cards and e-mails telling of Jim’s deeds whether it was encouraging a child on the soccer field or volunteering at a school event. Jim was truly a kind person who touched the lives of so many in his quiet way.

• Ellen Buccellato is a dedicated and energetic person who has given countless hours of her time to the community and to Hudson Valley Hospital Center. An advocate for the homeless and hungry, she is currently chairperson of Caring for the Homeless of Peekskill (CHOP.) CHOP has helped thousands to overcome hunger and homelessness through its shelter and feeding programs including the Jan Peek House Shelter for the Homeless, Sunny Donut Free Breakfast Program, and Fred’s Pantry at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church. Ellen has been very active in the Chaplaincy Program at Hudson Valley Hospital Center over the years. She’s been a representative for chaplains on HVHC’s Ethics Committee and HVHC’s Palliative Care Team. In collaboration with the hospital, Ellen organized a coat drive which collected over 200 coats for men, women and children. And under Ellen’s guidance, hospital employees donated non-perishable food items, toiletries, and new undergarments/socks. All items were distributed at the Jan Peek House Shelter for the homeless. Ellen is an active member of PAPA (Peekskill Area Pastors’ Association). She was inducted into the Westchester County Senior Citizens’ Hall of Fame in 2009.

• Santa’s Helpers was started 18 years ago when Hospital President John C. Federspiel suggested that instead of exchanging gifts, employees should start a fund to benefit the less fortunate. From that time on, the program was adopted by hospital employees, volunteers, physicians, board members and the entire hospital family. Each year, HVHC raises funds to buy $125 worth gifts each for a minimum of 100 children. From soliciting and reviewing the wish lists to fund raising, shopping and wrapping the presents, Santa’s Helpers has done extraordinary things. The program has raised about $250,000 over the years and provided a very happy holiday for more than 2,000 children. So many people have been involved in this program over the years it would be hard to name them all. Committee members are Sue Lepore, Denise Pilla, Rebecca Bowen, Debbie Petranchik and Maureen DiMaggio.

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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

 

 

Wednesday, 22 January 2014 17:23

Acts of Kindness

Acts of Kindness do make a difference. That's why Hudson Valley Hospital Center in celebration of its 125th Anniversary is asking the community to perform acts of kindness.

Small gestures go a long way: a smile, a compliment, giving someone the right of way on the road, giving up your seat on the subway. These small acts, restore our faith in humanity and lighten our daily load.

So we are challenging people to pledge to perform more acts of kindness in the New Year. Our goal is 125, but the sky is the limit. Afterall, it was an act of kindness that started the Hospital in 1889 when a small group of community-minded women purchased a pre-revolutionary house on lower South Street in Peekskill, which became the Helping Hand Hospital. And Hudson Valley has dedicated itself to fullfilling that 'Helping Hand' mission ever since.

Click here for some ideas for Random Acts of Kindness.

Acts of Kindness pledge forms are available at Hudson Valley Hospital Center and at area businesses in Peekskill, Cortlandt Manor and Yorktown. Fill out a form and we'll post it on our Acts of Kindness Wall. You can also e-mail us your Act of Kindness at JLIB_HTML_CLOAKING . Look for our HVHC 125h banners in your community.

 

Hudson Valley Hospital Center thanks its donors for supporting campaigns and events that helped us to develop and maintain important programs and services in 2013.

The big event of the year was Harvest of the Hudson Valley, a farm-to-table diner held at Glynwood Farm, a non-profit educational farm in Cold Spring whose mission is innovation in sustainable agricultural practice. It was the perfect setting for Chef Peter X. Kelly to cater the event. During the evening, a generous donor announced a significant gift naming the hospital’s new teaching kitchen for the Iron Chef winner.  Proceeds from the event, $265,000 as well as grants, including one from Newman Own Foundation, funded the construction of the new kitchen located at the Dempsey House on the hospital’s campus.

Later in the fall, the foundation hosted its annual Wine Tasting Event at Trump National Country Club in Briarcliff Manor, raising $27,000 to fund ongoing education and research by the physicians at the hospital’s Ashikari Breast Center. Proceeds from last year’s event were used to host 60 area surgical oncologists at an educational symposium at Arrowwood Conference Center in September 2013.

Finally, donors generously supported the foundation’s Building On Excellence Phase 2 Campaign which enhances the programs and services of the Cheryl R. Lindenbaum Cancer Center.

In this changing health care environment, philanthropy has become more important than ever for hospitals. The hospital’s Foundation provides donors access to many resources to help them make charitable gift decisions that can have significant tax benefits.  For more information, call the Foundation at 914-734-3526.

Tuesday, 07 January 2014 16:54

Avoid Hypothermia and Falls in Deep Freeze

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (January 7, 2014) – An arctic weather system that has dropped temperatures into the single digits is causing dangerous outdoor conditions in our area. Physicians at Hudson Valley Hospital Center are recommending some steps to help the public take extra precautions against the cold.

Dr. Barry Geller on staff in the Emergency Department at Hudson Valley Hospital Center said people who work outdoors, the elderly and children are at higher risk of hypothermia, a condition where the body temperature drops to dangerous levels.

“Keeping warm is especially important when the temperatures drop so low,’’ said Dr. Geller. “Limit the amount of time spent outdoors, but if you must go out dress in layers and wear a hat.”

Wearing several layers of clothing helps to insulate your body by trapping warm, dry air inside and wearing a hat is important since the head and neck lose heat faster than any other part of the body.

He said for those who work outdoors frostbite is an added danger. The cheeks, ear and nose and fingers are most prone to frostbite so those areas should be well-protected against the cold.

Signs of frostbite include white, waxy or grayish-yellow patches on the affected areas. The skin may feel cold and numb. If you suspect frostbite, get out of the cold and to a warm place immediately, remove clothing or jewelry that may be reducing circulation and seek medical attention.


Slips and falls are among some of the other more frequently seen injuries in emergency rooms this time of year. Dr. Geller said that more than a dozen accidents related to slips on the ice were seen at HVHC during the past few days, mostly hip and wrist fractures. Wearing proper shoes and making sure that walkways and steps are cleared and salted are the best way to avoid injuries.


Dr. Ari Mayerfield, hand surgeon at Hudson Valley Hospital Center, said that broken wrists often result in falls because people will instinctively reach out to with their hands to break a fall.


“This time of year, particularly when there is a lot of black ice in extreme temperatures as we have now, it is not unusual for people to be injured in falls,’’ said Dr. Mayerfield. “Getting the right treatment and quickly is very important.”


Dr. Mayerfield said that a broken arm or wrist bone will be extremely painful and there may also be swelling and tenderness. The best thing to do is to seek medical attention. You should first stabilize the arm with a sling and apply an ice pack to the area. A bag of frozen peas wrapped in a towel works well. The only way to really be sure if there is a break is with an X-ray.


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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care

Cortlandt Manor, NY - (January 3, 2014) – Not everyone gets the day off from work during a snowstorm as Hudson Valley Hospital Center employees can testify.

About 45 employees spent the night Thursday sleeping in the emergency room, hospital rooms or makeshift dormitories in conference rooms, day rooms and exam rooms, according to Nursing Supervisor Anna Slempa.

Slempa, who was in charge of coordinating the Hospital’s snow plan, said those who spent the night were a combination of people who worked the night shift Thursday and others who were scheduled to work days on Friday and came in early. She said these included physicians, as well as, people from emergency, radiology, nursing, ambulatory surgery, engineering and environmental. It also included people from departments such as dietary and finance that might not be considered essential personnel.

The hospital sent a driver to pick up about 10 people, mostly nurses.

“Everyone was in good spirits and cooperative,’’ said Slempa. “The most important thing is that we were staffed appropriately to take care of our patients during the storm.’’

As a reward, employees who stayed the night were treated to breakfast.

“It’s the least we could do to show our gratitude,’’ said Hospital President John Federspiel. “My thanks to everyone for pulling together during the storm to make sure our patients were comfortable and safe. I’m very proud to have such a dedicated staff.’’

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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org.
 

Thursday, 02 January 2014 16:30

First Baby of 2014 at HVHC

Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s first baby of the New Year 2014 arrived Jan. 1 at 5:35 p.m. Baby Ayleen born to Marcela Ona and Alex Quiroga of Peekskill weighed in at 7 lbs. and 7 ounces and was 20 inches long. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is the only Hospital in the region to be designated a “Baby Friendly” Hospital by Baby Friendly USA and the World Health Organization for its excellence in Maternity Care and Breastfeeding Support.


Cortlandt Manor, NY - (January 2, 2014) – When Dr. Kerline Marcelin steps off the plane in Haiti later this month it will be a déjà vu on several levels.

Marcelin, an ophthalmologist at Hudson Valley Hospital Center, first visited Haiti while in medical school and it was her trip there that inspired her to become an ophthalmologist. Add to that Marcelin’s background – her family is from Haiti – and it makes for a very meaningful trip on many levels.

“You could say that I am going back to my roots,’’ said Marcelin. “But more than that, going back to Haiti is coming full circle to what got me started in ophthalmology in the first place.”

What got her started in ophthalmology in the first place is what still inspires her today: giving the gift of sight. Marcelin, who teaches at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, will travel to Haiti from January 18-25 with the Crudem Foundation to work at the Sacred Heart Hospital (Hôpital Sacré Coeur) in Milot. There she hopes to perform surgery on glaucoma patients. She specializes in treating glaucoma, which is often referred to as the “sneak thief of sight” because it has no symptoms and can end in blindness if left untreated. Marcelin says that it is a particular problem in third world countries like Haiti where treatment is not readily available.

She will be traveling with a group of other ophthalmologists including a cataract surgeon from Boston. Marcelin said she will probably spend most of her time performing surgery to insert glaucoma drainage devices, which help to reduce pressure on the eye created from the buildup of fluids.

Marcelin said that she hopes that the trip will be the first of many and that she would like to eventually organize a group of her own to return to the islands each year. She said that her colleagues at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary are already inspired by her plans.

“I hope that once I return others will be inspired and I will be able to get more people involved,’’ she said.

Dr. Marcelin completed her Ophthalmology Residency at New York University Medical Center/Bellevue Hospital Center. She earned her Doctor of Medicine from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She received her fellowship training in glaucoma diseases at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.

To follow Dr. Marcelin’s travels, visit Hudson Valley Hospital Center on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hudsonvalleyhospital. To contact her office for an appointment, call 914-737-6360.

To learn more about the Crudem Foundation and its work visit www.crudem.org

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Hudson Valley Hospital Center is dedicated to serving the health care needs of the community and to providing quality, comprehensive medical care in a compassionate, professional, respectful manner, without regard to race, religion, national origin or disease category. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic treatment, education and preventive services, the Hospital is committed to improving the quality of life in the community. In fulfilling this mission, the Hospital will strive to continuously improve the care provided and develop and offer programs, facilities, systems and alliances that most effectively respond to community health care needs. Hudson Valley Hospital Center is located on Route 202 (1980 Crompond Road) in Cortlandt Manor, New York. Call 914-737-9000 or visit www.hvhc.org

 

Tuesday, 31 December 2013 09:52

Quick Reference Directory

Need to make an appointment? Here's a quick list of Hospital Departments. Main number is 914-737-9000.

 

Admitting/Registration - 734-3288

Ambulatory Surgery - 734-3741

Breast Center (Ashikari) - 734-3490

Cancer Center - 293-8400

Lung Cancer Screening - 293-8472

Melanoma Center - 734-8432

Cardio-Pulmonary Rehabilitation - 734-3810

Colonoscopy/Digestive Health - 603-5072

Emergency - 734-3300

Foundation - 734-3526

Food and Nutrition - 734-3305

Hospitality Shop - 734-3275

Human Resources - 734-3355

Information Desk/Lobby - 734-3231

Laboratory - 734-3281

Marketing/Public Relations - 734-3557.

Medical Affairs - 734-3324

Medical Records - 734-3212

Nursing floors

2 South - 734-3253

3 South - 734-3262

4 South - 734-3265

Intensive Care Unit - 734-3245

Progressive Care Unit - 734-3684

Maternity - 734-3257

Occupational therapy - 734-3642

Patient Accounts/Billing - 734-3858

Patient Financial Counselor - 734-3518

Patient Services - 734-3390

Pharmacy - 734-3235

Physical Rehabilitation - 734-3251

Plastic Surgery/Hand Surgery - 293-8700

Quality Management - 734-3611

Radiology/Women's Imaging Scheduling - 734-3674

Security - 734-3573

Sleep Center - 734-3840

Social Services - 734-3321

Volunteers - 734-3303

Wellness Club - 526-2336.

Westchester Medical Practice - 788-4635

Wound Care - 734-3030