Cortlandt Manor, NY - (March 19, 2013) – Hudson Valley Hospital Center’s 2nd Annual Winning Winter Whiskers fundraising campaign is off to a great start, raising over $11,000 so far.  But we need the community’s help to make our $35,000 goal. Nearly 30 men have signed up to grow their whiskers to benefit the Cheryl R. Lindenbaum Comprehensive Cancer Center. While it may be too late to join the whisker-growing competition, it’s not too late to support your favorite contestant. Sponsorships for this great event are also still available. Visit www.hvhc.orgto find out more.  “Our new event website has…
Cortlandt  Manor NY – (March 6, 2013) – Getting more exercise can give you a better night’s sleep. Sounds like common sense, but a national poll released this week by the National Sleep Foundation found that people who exercised more got a better night’s sleep even if they slept the same amount of time. “Exercise is great for sleep. For the millions of people who want better sleep, exercise may help,” says David Cloud, CEO of the National Sleep Foundation (NSF).   March 3-10 is National Sleep Awareness Month when health professionals focus on the important role that sleep plays in…
Cortlandt Manor, NY - (March 4, 2013) – While most people over 50 are familiar with the need for a colonoscopy, not as many people have this lifesaving screening as should, according to the Centers for Disease Control. March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month and to help educate the public on the importance of colon screenings. Hudson Valley Hospital Center will present a program on prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer as a first in a series of programs about digestive health. Dr. Herman Kleinbaum, a gastroenterologist with the Hudson Valley Center for Digestive Health, will speak on…
Cortlandt Manor, NY - (February 28, 2013) – Yearly mammography screening for signs of breast cancer is essential for basic breast health, but now the Women’s Imaging Center at HVHC is offering a new, ultra-sensitive screening that can detect potential cancers through 3-dimensional imaging. The new technology, called digital tomosynthesis, is not for everyone, but it is useful for high-risk patients and can help radiologists clarify inconclusive test results. “A normal digital mammography provides two 2-D images: each side of the breast is imaged twice, totaling  four images per breast, which radiologists can use to look for any abnormalities,” says…