Cardiology

Hudson Valley Cardiology is now part of NewYork-Presbyterian Medical Group Hudson Valley, in conjunction with Columbia University Medical Center.

Hudson Valley Cardiology has operated in northern Westchester and at NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital for over 30 years. These highly-regarded physicians specialize in all facets of cardiac, diagnostic and medical care, including nuclear, vascular and interventional cardiology, echocardiography, and internal medicine.

NewYork-Presbyterian Medical Group Hudson Valley Cardiology Team

Pictured, from left: Ricardo Esquitin, MD, RPVI, Alan Slater, MD, FACC, Patrick Thomas, MD, FACC, FAHA, Glenn Hamroff, MD, FACC, John Koval, RPA-C, Craig Hametz, MD, FACC, Frank Dorsa, MD, FACC, Howard Tarkin, MD, FACC, Benjamin Spooner, RPA-C

The group will continue to practice at their current locations in Cortlandt Manor, Putnam Valley and Yorktown Heights. They also will operate out of a new office opening in Cold Spring in the coming months. The team includes: 

Frank Dorsa, MD, FACC
Dr. Dorsa is board certified in cardiovascular disease and internal medicine. He graduated from New York University and received his medical degree from the Autonomous University of Guadalajara. He completed a fellowship at the noninvasive cardiology laboratory at New York University Medical Center.

Ricardo Esquitin, MD, RPVI
Dr. Esquitin is board certified in cardiovascular disease and internal medicine. He is a graduate of Harvard University and received his medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine, where he also completed his residency. Dr. Esquitin completed a fellowship of cardiovascular disease at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. 

Craig D. Hametz, MD, FACC
Dr. Hametz is board certified in cardiovascular disease and internal medicine. He graduated from Cornell University and received his medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Following that Dr. Hametz completed a fellowship at North Shore University Hospital.

Glenn S. Hamroff, MD, FACC
Dr. Hamroff is board certified in cardiovascular disease. He graduated from SUNY Binghamton and received his medical degree from SUNY, Health Science Center at Brooklyn-College of Medicine. He completed fellowships in cardiology at Montefiore and in congestive heart failure at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. 

Alan H. Slater, MD, FACC
Dr. Slater is board certified in cardiovascular disease. He is a graduate of New York University and received his medical degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Slater completed his fellowship in cardiovascular medicine and interventional cardiology at Yale University School of Medicine.

Howard Tarkin, MD, FACC
Dr. Tarkin is board certified in cardiovascular disease. He is a graduate of SUNY College at Oneonta and received his medical degree from SUNY Health Science Center at Brooklyn- College of Medicine. Dr. Tarkin completed his fellowship at the University of Connecticut Health Center.

Patrick W. Thomas, MD, FACC, FAHA
Dr. Thomas is board certified in cardiovascular disease and nuclear cardiology. He graduated from Cornell University and received his medical degree from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Thomas completed his fellowship at The University of Chicago Hospitals. 

New patients are welcome at all locations. For information, call any of the offices:

Cold Spring (Opening 2017)
1756 Route 9D, Cold Spring, NY 10516
914-736-0703 

Cortlandt Manor
1978 Crompond Rd. Ste. 202 Cortlandt Manor, NY
914-736-0703 

Putnam Valley
11 Peekskill Hollow Rd. Putnam Valley, NY
845-528-8086 

Yorktown Heights
2050 Saw Mill River Road, 2nd floor, Yorktown Heights, NY
914-736-0703

Signs of a Heart Attack

Heart disease is one of the top killers of men and women. Heart attack warning signs:

  • Chest discomfort
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body (arms, back, neck, jaw, stomach)
  • Shortness of breath
  • Other - cold sweat, nausea, or light-headedness

Minutes Matter

Treatment can stop a heart attack in its tracks. Clot-busting drugs and other artery-opening treatments work best to stop a heart attack if given within one hour of the start of symptoms. If you or someone else is having heart attack warning signs: Call 9-1-1. Don't wait more than a few minutes - five minutes at most - to call 9-1-1. If symptoms stop completely in less than five minutes, you should still call your health care provider.

Nutrition

Good nutrition is important for preventing heart disease and stroke. Healthy food habits help maintain normal blood pressure, desirable blood cholesterol levels and a healthy body weight. High blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and excess body weight are the results of poor food choices. The American Heart Association recommends a diet low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. Heart-healthy foods include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, fat-free or low-fat dairy products, and dietary fiber.

Cooking classes which focus on making heart healthy food choices and preparing nutritious meals and snacks are held frequently at NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital’s Chef Peter X. Kelly Teaching Kitchen, at 1992 Crompond Road, Cortlandt Manor.  To find out more, including upcoming classes and programs, click here.